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Ideas of Landscape

Ideas of Landscape

Matthew Johnson

ISBN: 978-1-405-17833-4

Apr 2008, Wiley-Blackwell

264 pages

$43.99

Description

Ideas of Landscape discusses the current theory and practice of landscape archaeology and offers an alternative agenda for landscape archaeology that maps more closely onto the established empirical strengths of landscape study and has more contemporary relevance.

  • The first historical assessment of a critical period in archaeology
  • Takes as its focus the so-called English landscape tradition -- the ideological underpinnings of which come from English Romanticism, via the influence of the “father of landscape history”: W. G. Hoskins
  • Argues that the strengths and weaknesses of landscape archaeology can be traced back to the underlying theoretical discontents of Romanticism
  • Offers an alternative agenda for landscape archaeology that maps more closely onto the established empirical strengths of landscape study and has more contemporary relevance
List of Figures.

Acknowledgements.

The Argument.

Preface: Thinking about Swaledale.

1. Introduction.

2. Lonely as a Cloud.

3. A Good Pair of Boots.

4. The Loss of Innocence.

5. Landscape Archaeology Today.

6. The Politics of Landscape.

7. Conclusion.

Glossary.

References.

Index

"I have always found Johnson’s work … extremely inviting, engaging and thoughtful. Ideas of Landscape is no exception." (Cambridge Archaeological Journal, October 2008)

“One might suggest that in this excellent work, Johnson has written an archaeology of knowledge concerning landscape studies. A glossary and illustrations add meaningfully to a work of much industry … Highly recommended.” (Choice)

Ideas of Landscape is a towering contribution--shall we say, a high vantage point from which one can
survey a scholarly landscape?” (Canadian Journal of Archaeology)


  • The first historical assessment of a critical period in archaeology
  • Takes as its focus the so-called English landscape tradition -- the ideological underpinnings of which come from English Romanticism, via the influence of the “father of landscape history”: W. G. Hoskins
  • Argues that the strengths and weaknesses of landscape archaeology can be traced back to the underlying theoretical discontents of Romanticism
  • Offers an alternative agenda for landscape archaeology that maps more closely onto the established empirical strengths of landscape study and has more contemporary relevance