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$90.00

Interior Detailing: Concept to Construction

David Kent Ballast FAIA, CSI

ISBN: 978-0-470-95040-1 November 2010 304 Pages

Description

The all-in-one interior detailing guide that unites creative and technical aspects

A well-executed interior space requires the successful combination of the creative and the technical. Interior Detailing bridges the gap between design and construction, and shows how to develop and transform design concepts into details that meet the constraints, functional requirements, and constructability issues that are part of any interior design element. It offers guidance on how design professionals can combine imaginative thinking and the application of technical resources to create interiors that are aesthetically pleasing, functionally superior, and environmentally sound. Interior Detailing:

  • Includes 150 easy-to-understand details showing how to logically think through the design and development of an assembly so that it conforms to the designer's intent and meets the practical requirements of good construction

  • Describes how to solve any detailing design problem in a rational way

  • Contains conceptual and practical approaches to designing and detailing construction components thatform interior spaces

  • Shows how a small number of principles can be used to solve nearly any detailing problem

This guide covers the subject of interior spaces comprehensively by balancing the contributions of physical beauty and structural integrity in one complete volume. By following the principles laid out in this book, interior designers and architects can plan for the construction of a unique interior environment more thoughtfully and with a clearer, better-defined purpose.

List of Tables xiii

List of Illustrations xv

Preface xix

Acknowledgments xxi

Introduction xxiii

How SI Units Are Used in This Book  xxv

Part 1 Roadmap To Solving Detailing Problems

1 The Design/Detailing Process 3

1-1 Introduction 3

1-2 What Is Detailing? 3

Detailing as a Wicked Problem 4

1-3 The Drawing-Thinking-Drawing Cycle 5

1-4 Process Tools and Techniques 6

Process Tools 6

Practical Tips 8

1-5 Detailing Components and Process 11

The Four Aspects of Detailing 11

The Detailing Process 12

Example 12

1-6 Three Purposes of a Detail 16

Contributes to Design Concept 16

Resolves Problems of Connection or Transition 17

Coordinates with Adjacent Construction 17

1-7 Programmatic Concepts versus Design Concepts 17

2 Constraints 19

2-1 Introduction 19

2-2 Substrates and Adjacent Construction 19

Substrate Material 21

Substrate Condition 21

Substrate Size and Position 21

Substrate Space 21

2-3 Regulatory Requirements 22

Fire Tests for Finish Materials 23

Fire Tests for Construction Assemblies 27

2-4 Budget 28

2-5 Time 29

2-6 Climate 29

2-7 Local Labor Conditions and Trade Practices 29

2-8 Industry Standards 30

2-9 Materials 34

Aesthetic Qualities 35

Function 35

Safety and Health 37

Durability 38

Maintainability 39

Cost and Delivery Time 40

Sustainability 40

3 Function 41

3-1 Introduction 41

3-2 Concealment and Finish 41

Covering Substrates 41

Covering Joints and Connections 42

Hiding Mechanical and Electrical Services 46

3-3 Human Fit/Object Fit 49

Base Dimensions on Human Size and Reach or Object Size 49

Recognize Differences in Age, Height, Abilities 51

Provide Adjustable Details 52

Provide Alternate Fits 52

3-4 Safety: Protection from Accidental Harm 52

Use Nonslip Flooring 52

Avoid Sharp Edges Close to Human Contact 52

Provide Handrails and Guards When Necessary 53

Design Stairs Correctly 53

Mark Full-Height Glass 55

Avoid Single Steps 55

Avoid Slight Change of Level 55

Use Nontoxic Materials 55

3-5 Security: Protection from Intentional Harm 55

Use Locks, Detection, and Intrusion Alarms as Appropriate 56

Design Physical Barriers for the Level of Security Required 56

Use Electronic Surveillance When Required 56

Use Ballistic-Resistant Assemblies 56

Devise Space Plan for Supervision 57

3-6 Sustainability 58

Detail with Materials That Incorporate as Little Embodied Energy as Possible 58

Use Renewable Materials 59

Use Materials with High Recycled Content 59

When Possible, Use Products or Design Details That Can Reduce Energy Consumption 60

Use Local Materials 60

Use Materials with Low or No VOCs 60

Use Materials with Low Toxicity 60

Design Details and Select Materials to Minimize Moisture Problems 61

Use Durable Materials and Details 61

Design Details to Simplify Maintenance 61

Specify Materials and Design Details to Maximize Recycling Potential 61

Design Details for Reusability 62

3-7 Change and Relocatability 63

Design for Relocating the Detail with the Same User 63

Detail for the Same Function but with a Change in Users 63

Detail for a Change of Function of the Space with Different Users 64

3-8 Fire Resistance 64

Use Noncombustible Materials in Details 64

Limit the Amount of Flammable Materials 64

Use Applied Fire Retardants When Required 64

Use Only Tested and Rated Assemblies and Materials 65

Use Listed or Labeled Components 66

3-9 Acoustical Control 66

Noise Control and Reverberation 66

Transmission Control 68

Vibration and Impact Noise Control 72

3-10 Moisture/Water Resistance 74

Use Nonabsorbent Materials 74

Use Nonferrous Metals 75

Eliminate or Minimize Joints 75

Employ Overlap 75

Use Drips 75

Use the Correct Sealant and Joint Design 75

4 Constructability 77

4-1 Introduction 77

4-2 Structural Requirements 77

Basic Concepts of Structure 78

Use Simple Direct Bearing Connections Whenever Possible 79

Incorporate Beam Action 79

Use the Simplest Connections Possible 80

Use Redundant Connections or Bearing When Required 80

Use Structural Connections Approved by the Manufacturer 80

Use Removable Connections for Reuse Potential 81

4-3 Connections 81

Use the Appropriate Method for Rigid Connections 81

Determine Movable Connection Type Based on Use 82

Minimize Number and Types of Connections 82

Make Connections Accessible 83

4-4 Movement 83

Use Acclimated Materials 84

Use Relieved Backs on Wood 84

Use Control Joints 85

Provide Expansion Joints 85

Use Sliding/Overlapping Joints 86

Use Slip Joints 86

Use Building Expansion Joints 88

Provide Clear Space 88

4-5 Tolerances 89

Provide Shim Space 90

Provide Scribe 91

Use Reveals 91

Use Offsets 92

Use Filler Strips 92

Use Sliding or Overlapping Fit 92

Use Adjustable Connections 92

Give Adequate Clearance and Incorporate Intermediate Attachments 93

4-6 Clearances 93

Allow Space for Working and Assembly 93

Provide Space for Installation of Pieces 93

Allow for Tolerances 93

4-7 Durability 94

Self-Durable 94

Applied Protection 94

4-8 Maintainability 95

Cleanability 95

Adjustability 96

Repair and Replacement 98

4-9 Construction Process 99

Number of Parts 99

Sequence 100

Trade Division of Labor 100

Off-Shelf versus Custom Parts 101

Shop versus Field Fabricated 101

Part 2 elements

5 Dividing And Creating Space With Permanent Barriers 105

5-1 Introduction 105

5-2 Element Concepts 106

5-3 Function 106

5-4 Constraints 107

5-5 Coordination 108

Tolerance Coordination 108

5-6 Methods 109

Planar 109

Panelized 113

Barriers with Openings 118

Translucent 120

Partial Height 126

Thick 129

6 Dividing And Creating Space With Temporary Barriers 133

6-1 Introduction 133

6-2 Element Concepts 134

6-3 Function 135

6-4 Constraints 136

6-5 Coordination 137

6-6 Methods 137

Full Height 138

Partial Height 138

7 Overhead Limits—Ceilings 141

7-1 Introduction 141

7-2 Element Concepts 141

7-3 Function 144

7-4 Constraints 145

7-5 Coordination 146

Sprinkler Spacing 147

HVAC Coordination 148

Tolerance Coordination 149

7-6 Methods 150

Closed 150

Open 155

8 The Ground Plane—Floors, Stairs, And Ramps 159

8-1 Introduction 159

8-2 Element Concepts 159

Flooring 160

Stairs 161

Ramps 161

8-3 Function 162

8-4 Constraints 163

Fire Resistance of Floor Finishes 163

Fire Resistance of Structural Flooring Components 164

Slip Resistance and Tripping 165

Accessibility 165

Code Requirements 165

8-5 Coordination 168

Tolerance Coordination 168

Light Reflectance and Acoustic Coordination 169

8-6 Methods 169

Flooring 169

Handrails, Guards, and Stairways 175

9 Spatial Connection—Openings, Doors, And Glazing 179

9-1 Introduction 179

9-2 Element Concepts 180

Openings 180

Doors 180

Glazing 182

Window Covering 183

9-3 Function 185

9-4 Constraints 186

9-5 Coordination 187

9-6 Methods 187

Doors 187

Glazed Openings 189

Window Coverings 196

Part 3 Transitions

10 Wall Transitions 199

10-1 Introduction 199

10-2 Connections of Major Elements 199

10-3 Wall to Floor 200

Standard Bases 201

Featured Bases 203

Component Bases 208

10-4 Wall to Ceiling 209

Standard Ceiling Transitions 210

Structural Transitions 212

Planar Transitions 215

11 Planar Transitions 219

11-1 Partition to Partition 219

In-Plane Transitions 219

Plain Offsets 221

11-2 Floor to Floor 226

In-Plane Transitions 226

Plain Offset Floors 229

Interrupted Offset  229

11-3 Ceiling to Ceiling  231

In-Plane Transitions  232

Offset Transitions 234

12 Structural Transitions 239

12-1 Introduction 239

12-2 Columns 240

Column-to-Ceiling Transitions 240

Column-to-Floor Transitions 244

Column-to-Beam Transitions 246

12-3 Beams 250

Beam-to-Partition Transitions 250

Beam-to-Ceiling Transitions 252

Beam-to-Beam Transitions 254

12-4 Suspended Objects 255

Thin Supports 256

Clamps 256

Thick Supports 257

Rigid Supports 258

Appendix A: Resources 259

Appendix B: Industry Standards for Interior Materials and Products 261

Index 273