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Kinematic Analysis of Human Movement

Kinematic Analysis of Human Movement

Laurence Chèze

ISBN: 978-1-119-05814-4

Nov 2014

144 pages

Description

After a quick survey of the famous pioneers of human movement analysis and the actual needs in different domains, this book presents the main types of systems available on the market (with the pros and cons), and then details the most widely used: the optoelectronic systems using passive markers. The theoretical background for joint kinematics calculation is explained, specifying the international standardization for parameters reports. One chapter is dedicated to measurement errors and their management, followed by several applications, mostly in the clinical field.

FOREWORD ix

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION AND STATE OF THE ART 1

1.1. Historical benchmarks 2

1.2. Current needs in different domains 9

1.2.1. Simulation of movement in ergonomics 9

1.2.2. The command of humanoid robots 11

1.2.3. The analysis of sporting movements 13

1.2.4. Clinical applications of movement analysis 14

CHAPTER 2. THE DIFFERENT MOVEMENT ANALYSIS DEVICES AVAILABLE ON THE MARKET 17

2.1. Which tools for different applications? 17

2.2. Optical capture systems and passive tags 24

2.2.1. Working principle of an optical system with passive markers    24

2.2.2. Implementation steps of an experimental protocol using this type of system 30

CHAPTER 3. FROM MEASUREMENT TO INTERPRETATION 35

3.1. The different parameters 35

3.2. Recommendations by the International Society of Biomechanics to standardize the presentation of joint angles 49

3.3. Joint translations or displacements 54

CHAPTER 4. ERRORS IN MEASUREMENT  59

4.1. Instrumental errors  59

4.2. Experimental errors  60

4.2.1. Soft tissue artifacts 61

4.3. Error in locating anatomical landmarks 68

4.3.1. Assessment 68

4.3.2. Sensitivity of joint kinematics to these errors 71

CHAPTER 5. SOME CLINICAL APPLICATIONS  73

5.1. Evolution of biomechanical parameters of gait in infants, from first steps to 7 years old 74

5.1.1. Materials and methods    74

5.1.2. Results and discussion    76

5.2. Upper limb, assessment of functional movements 81

5.3. Mobility of a healthy cervical spine 87

5.3.1. Materials and methods    87

5.3.2. Results and discussion    91

5.4. Changes in the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee with medial compartment arthrosis  94

5.4.1. Materials and methods    95

5.4.2. Results and discussion    99

CONCLUSION AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES 103

BIBLIOGRAPHY  107

INDEX   129