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LTE Services

Jean-Gabriel Rémy, Charlotte Letamendia

ISBN: 978-1-119-04398-0

Sep 2014, Wiley-ISTE

200 pages

$87.99

Description

LTE (Long Term Evolution) is commonly marketed as 4G. LTE and LTE Advanced have been recognized by ITU-R and ITU-T (International Telecommunications Union – Telecommunications) as the principal solution for the future mobile communication networks standards. They are thus the framework of what the marketing calls 4G and possibly also 5G.

This book describes various aspects of LTE as well as the change of paradigm, which it is bringing to mobile communications, focusing on LTE standards and architecture, OFDMA, the Full IP Core Network and LTE security.

LIST OF FIGURES  ix

LIST OF TABLES  xiii

INTRODUCTION xv

CHAPTER 1. LTE ROLL-OUT 1

1.1. LTE air interface superior features 1

1.1.1. Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access (OFDMA) for the downlink 1

1.1.2. Single-carrier frequency division multiple access for uplink 1

1.1.3. Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) transmission 2

1.1.4. Support for component carrier 10

1.1.5. Relaying 11

1.2. LTE FDD, TDD and TD-LTE duplex schemes 13

1.2.1. Duplex schemes 14

1.2.2. LTE TDD/TD-LTE and TD-SCDMA 17

1.2.3. FDD LTE frequency band allocations 18

1.2.4. Allocated frequency bands in Europe, multiband operation 19

1.2.5. TDD LTE frequency band allocations 21

1.3. LTE UE category and class definitions 22

1.3.1. LTE UE category rationale 22

1.3.2. LTE UE category definitions 23

1.4. Interferences in OFDMA 25

1.5. Radio propagation software 35

1.6. Macrocells, microcells and femtocells 37

1.6.1. Macrocells 37

1.6.2. Femtocells 38

1.6.3. Remote radio heads 40

1.6.4. Heterogeneous network 40

1.7. Backhaul  40

1.7.1. The unified backhau l41

1.7.2. Future of Ethernet backhau l42

1.7.3. UMTS IP NodeB transport over converged packet network 44

1.7.4. LTE/EPC transport over converged packet network 49

1.8. Frequency planning 66

1.9. Compatibility with DTT 67

1.10. Health effects 68

1.10.1. Physical facts 69

1.10.2. Specific energy absorption rate 72

1.10.3. International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection 73

1.10.4. Measurements of SAR, experimental studies 75

1.10.5. Comparison of SAR caused by different devices 77

1.10.6. Safety limits – towers 80

1.11. Appendix 1: radio dimensioning and planning exercises (courtesy of Emmanuelle Vivier) 81

1.12. Appendix 2: relaying the radio links 84

1.13. Appendix 3: LTE-Advanced: requirements 88

CHAPTER 2. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 91

2.1. Introduction 91

2.2. Load tests 93

2.2.1. Dimensioning of network elements to smoothly carry the traffic 93

2.2.2. Dimensioning of signaling channels 94

2.2.3. Load tests on signaling channels 101

2.3. Use of protocol analyzer: example of MAPS system  102

2.3.1. Background 102

2.3.2. Overview 102

2.3.3. Main features 103

2.3.4. Supported protocol standards 104

2.3.5. Test configuration 105

2.3.6. Call generation 106

2.3.7. Call reception 106

2.3.8. Bulk call simulation 108

2.3.9. Customization of call flow and messages using preprocessing tools 108

2.3.10. Call flow and script execution control 109

2.3.11. Call statistics, events, link status 109

2.4. Appendix: TS of SA5 working group of 3GPP TSG SA 110

CHAPTER 3. OTT SERVICES 151

3.1. Introduction 151

3.1.1. Impact of the technology 151

3.1.2. OTT applications 153

3.1.3. OTT over LTE 153

3.1.4. New services opened by the high-speed Internet generalization 154

3.2. Technical view of OTT services 155

3.2.1. OTT technology 155

3.2.2. Testing OTT performances 161

3.3. OTT services challenging TV telecommunication services 162

3.3.1. Instant messaging business 163

3.3.2. Television and video OTT services 165

3.3.3. Apple TV (source: Wikipedia) 167

3.3.4. Netflix, the 2014 OTT champion 169

3.3.5. “OTT services” provided by the network operators 170

3.3.6. The carrier: neutral or responsible? 171

3.4. OTT services other than television 173

3.4.1. Dedicated services 173

3.4.2. LBS: positioning and GPS-driven applications  174

3.5. Open applications versus verticalization 177

3.5.1. The Apple model 177

CONCLUSION  179

BIBLIOGRAPHY 191

INDEX 193