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Language Variation as Social Practice: The Linguistic Construction of Identity in Belten High

Language Variation as Social Practice: The Linguistic Construction of Identity in Belten High

Penelope Eckert

ISBN: 978-0-631-18604-5

Apr 2000, Wiley-Blackwell

260 pages

In Stock

$60.95

Description

This volume provides an ethnographically rich account of sociolinguistic variation in an adolescent population.
List of Figures.

List of Tables.

Preface.

Introduction: Variation and Agency.

Interpreting the Meaning of Variation.

The Social Order of Belten High.

Sociolinguistic Research in the School.

The Vocalic Variables.

Outline of Variation in Belten High.

We Are What We Do.

Friendships, Networks, and Communities of Practice.

Style, Social Meaning, and Sound Change.

References.

Index.

"This long-awaited volume demonstrates that Eckert is the sociolinguist. No other student of language and society comes close to Eckert in providing social explanations for linguistic behavior and no other study has probed so deeply the social motivation of sound change. Eckert's unique combination of ethnographic practice and sophisticated quantitative analyses will be the target to emulate for many decades to come." Bill Labov, University of Pennsylvania

"Penelope Eckert's work provides a fine ethnographic account of the social organization and social practices of a varied set of Detroit adolescents. At the same time, she builds in a much-needed critique of current sociolinguistic work on the relationship between language variation and social constructs such as class and gender. The work as a whole is an excellent and readable synthesis, representing the current state of the art in sociolinguistics." Lesley Milroy, University of Michigan

"Nobody combines the insights of ethnographic study and variation analysis more creatively than Eckert. She invariably connects systematic language variation with the complexities of social practice in a way that challenges our reified interpretations of sociolinguistic behavior." Walt Wolfram, North Carolina State University

"Eckert has provided us with an array of priceless information on the local social matrix in which change takes place. If we are not ready to answer every question that might be posed about linguistic change, the first step is to master the rich store of information and insight that she has given us, and to plan our future research with this in mind." Language in Society

* Provides an ethnographically rich account of sociolinguistic variation in an adolescent population.
* Shows how local processes coincide with the global patterning of variation with class, gender and age.
* Uncovers the nature of social meaning and the dynamics of influence in variation.