Skip to main content

Leaders, Groups and Coalitions: Understanding the People and Processes in Foreign Policymaking

Leaders, Groups and Coalitions: Understanding the People and Processes in Foreign Policymaking

Magaret G. Herman (Editor), Joe Hagan (Editor)

ISBN: 978-0-631-23163-9

Dec 2001, Wiley-Blackwell

210 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$63.95

Description

How do we determine whose positions count in the making of foreign policy? Does it matter how these policy makers are configured? Does the decision-making process such people engage in influence the type of policy that results? This volume synthesizs the literatures on leadership, group dynamics, organizational theory, and coalition politics to demonstrate how the nature of the decision unity shapes foreign policy.

  • Synthesizes theories on leadership, group dynamics, organizational theory, and coalition politics to demonstrate how the nature of the decision unit shapes foreign policy
  • Authors explore how policymakers' preferences become aggregated in the foreign policymaking process when there is a predominant leader or there are single groups or coalitions
Preface.

Part I: Does Decision Making Matter? Joe D. Hagan.

Part II: How Decision Units Shape Foreign Policy: A Theoretical Framework: Margaret G. Hermann.

Part III: Who Leads Matters: The Effects of Powerful Individuals: Margaret G. Hermann; Thomas Preston; Baghat Korany; Timothy M. Shaw.

Part IV: Resolve, Accept, or Avoid: Effects of Group Conflict on Foreign Policy Decisions: Charles F. Hermann; Janice Gross Stein; Bengt Sundelius; Stephen G. Walker.

Part V: Foreign Policy by Coalition: Deadlock, Compromise, and Anarchy: Joe D. Hagan; Philip P. Everts; Haruhiro Fukui; John D. Stempel.

Part VI: People and Processes in Foreign Policymaking: Insights from Comparative Case Studies: Ryan K. Beasley; Juliet Kaarbo; Charles F. Hermann; Margaret G. Hermann.


  • Synthesizes theories on leadership, group dynamics, organizational theory, and coalition politics to demonstrate how the nature of the decision unit shapes foreign policy.
  • Authors explore how policymakers' preferences become aggregated in the foreign policymaking process when there is a predominant leader or there are single groups or coalitions.