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Learning to Program with VISUAL BASIC.Net

Learning to Program with VISUAL BASIC.Net

Patrick G. McKeown

ISBN: 978-0-471-22971-1

Aug 2003

544 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$123.95

Description

This is a true introductory programming book, appropriate for the first programming course. Most other books do not teach programming but teach the syntax of VB or highlight the "gee whiz" features of the VB interface. Visual Basic has been replacing COBOL as an introductory programming language for CIS/MIS students due to its ease of use and the near universal move to the Windows operating system. McKeown's text addresses the need for a text that offers an adequate balance between the demonstration of the Visual Basic interface and teaching programming logic that the student must know regardless of the language. The goal of this book is "to achieve a balance between demonstrating the power and excitement of Visual Basic and the need to teach traditional programming logic."

Related Resources

1. An Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic .NET.

2. Using Visual Basic .NET to Create a First Project.

3. Variables, Assignment Statements, and Arithmetic.

4. The Selection Process in Visual Basic .NET.

5. The Repetition Prosess in Visual Basic .NET.

6. Working with Arrays in Visual Basic .NET.

7. Using Functions, Stubs, and Modules .NET. 

8. Using User-Defined Data Types and Object-Oriented Programming.

9. Working with Databases in Visual Basic .NET.

10. Security, Menus, Files, and Graphics.

  • New coverage has been added as appropriate to take advantage of the .net platform.
  • New 2-color design.
  • Each book can be packaged with the full, unlimited version of VB.net.


  • Teaches introductory programming concepts rather than only the "glitz" of VB.
  • Teaches programming logic without exposing the student to an excessive amount of VB controls. Students can transfer what they learn to other programming languages.
  • A running case is developed throughout the text, which helps students to apply what they are learning. The running case helps students understand how an actual information system is created for a situation with which they are familiar (a video store).
  • "It's Your Turn" (IYT) exercises help students complete the same example as is discussed in the text. The IYT exercises force the student to keep up and when they complete them for a chapter, they have a working VB project. If the student completes these IYT's throughout the entire book, at the end, they will have a fairly sophisticated information system completed. The IYT's are linked to the code tables (which show all of the code for every program) and to the screen capture figures to help the student do the work.
  • All code is shown in code tables so students can create the same examples as discussed in the text by reproducing the code shown in code tables.
  • Useful Web site containing extra cases, sample code, and other features for students and professors.