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Lectures on Conversation, Volumes I and II

Lectures on Conversation, Volumes I and II

Harvey Sacks, Gail Jefferson (Editor), Emanuel A. Schegloff (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-444-32830-1

Jun 2010

1520 pages

Select type: Wiley Online Book

Description

Volume I contains the lectures of Fall 1964 through Fall 1967, in which Sacks explores a great variety of topics, from suicide to children's games to Medieval Hell as a nemonic device to pronouns and paradoxes. But two key issues emerge: rules of conversational sequencing - central to the articulation of interaction, and membership categorization devices - central to the social organization of knowledge. This volume culminates in the extensive and formal explication of turn-taking which Sacks delivered in Fall, 1967.
Volume II contains the lectures of Spring 1968 through Spring 1972. Again he touches on a wide range of subjects, such as the poetics of ordinary talk, the integrative function of public tragedy, and pauses in spelling out a word. He develops a major new theme: storytelling in converstion, with an attendant focus on topic. His investigation of conversational sequencing continues, and this volume culminates in the elegant dissertation on adjacency pairs which Sacks delivered in Spring, 1972.
Introduction by Emanuel A. Schegloff.

Note.

Acknowledgments..

Part I Fall 1964-Spring 1965.

Lecture 1 Rules of conversational sequence.

Lecture 2 On suicide threats getting laughed off.

Lecture 3 The correction-invitation device.

Lecture 4. An impromptu survey of the literature.

Lecture 5. Suicide as a device for discovering if anybody cares.

Lecture 6. The MIR membership categorization device.

Lecture 7. On questions.

Lecture 8. On measuring.

Lecture 9. ""I am nothing"".

Lecture 10. Accountable actions.

Lecture 11. On exchanging glances.

Lecture 12. Sequencing: Utterances, jokes, and questions.

Lecture 13. On proverbs.

Lecture 14. The inference-making machine.

Appendix A. A Note on the Editing..

Part II Fall 1965.

[Lecture 1 and 2] [""The baby cried. The mommy picked it up.""].

Handout Group therapy session segment.

Lecture 3. A collaboratively build sentence; The use of ‘We’.

Lecture 4. Tying rules.

Lecture 5. Tying rules; Insult sequences.

Lecture 6. ‘You’.

Lecture 7. ‘Hotrodders’ as a revolutionary category.

Lecture 8. Invitations; Inexhaustable topics; Category-bound activities.

Lecture 9. Character appears on cue; Good grounds for an action.

Lecture 10. Clausal construction; Hotrodding as a test.

Lecture 11. Espousing a rule; Exemplary occurrences.

Lecture 12. ‘Tearing down;’ Non-translatable categories.

[Lecture 13] [‘Everyone has to lie’].

Lecture 14. The navy pilot [from Sacks’ Research Notes].

Appendix A. ""The baby cried"" [Notes for lecture 1].

Appendix B. ""The baby cried"" [Notes on lecture 2]..

Part III Spring 1966.

Lecture 1. ""The baby cried. The mommy picked it up"".

Lecture 1 (R) ""The baby cried. The mommy picked it up"".

Lecture 2. ""The baby cried. The mommy picked it up"" (ctd).

Lecture 2 (R) ""The baby cried. The mommy picked it up"" (ctd).

[Lecture 3] [‘Everyone has to lie’].

Handout Group therapy session segment.

Lecture 04.a An introduction sequence.

Lecture 04.b An introduction sequence (ctd).

Lecture 4. Invitations; Identifications; Category-bound activities.

Lecture 5. Proffering identification; The navy pilot; Slots; Paired objects, Adequate complete utterances.

Lecture 6. Omni-relevant devices; Cover identifications.

Lecture 7. Cover topics; Collaborative sentences; Tying rules; Relational-pair identifications.

Lecture 08. Orientation; Being ‘phoney;’ Hinting.

Lecture 8. ‘We;’ Category-bound activities.

[Lecture 9] [incorporated into lectures 8 and 10].

Lecture 10. Pro-verbs; Performatives; Position markers; Warnings.

Lecture 11. ‘You’.

Lecture 12. Warnings, challenges, and corrections; Explanations; Complaining-praising; Games.

Lecture 13. Button-button who’s got the button.

Lecture 14. Disorderability; Tying rules.

Lecture 15. Tying rules; Playing dumb; Correction-invitation device.

Lecture 16. Possessive pronouns; Possessables and possessitives.

Lecture 17. Pervasive, inexhaustible topics; Emblems.

Lecture 18. ‘Hotrodders’ as a revolutionary category.

Lecture 19. Appearance verbs.

Lecture 20. Character appears on cue; Good grounds for an action; An explanation is the explanation.

Lecture 21. Misidentification; Membership categories; Utterance pairs; Paradoxes.

[Lecture 22] [combined with lecture 21].

Lecture 23. Agreement; What can be done with language?.

Lecture 24. Measurement systems.

Lecture 25. ‘Company’ as an alternation category [incomplete].

Lecture 26. Being ‘chicken’ versus ‘giving lip back’.

Lecture 27. A mis-hearing (""a green?""); A taboo on hearing.

Lecture 28. Intelligibility; Causally efficacious categories.

Lecture 29. Place references; Weak and safe compliments.

Lecture 30. Various methodological issues.

Lecture 31. Games: legal and illegal actions.

Lecture 32. Seeing an ‘imitation’.

Lecture 33. On sampling and subjectivity.

Appendix A. ‘On some formal properties of children’s games’.

Appendix B. A Note on the Editing..

Part IV Winter 1967.

February 16. Omnirelevant devices; Settinged activities; ‘Indicator terms’.

March 2. Turn-taking; Collaborative utterances via appendor questions; Instructions; Directed utterance.

March 9. Topic; Utterance placement; ‘Activity occupied’ phenomena; Formulations; Euphemisms.

Part V Spring 1967.

[Lecture 1-7] [‘One party speaks at a time’].

Lecture 8. ""Everyone has to lie."".

Lecture 9. ""Everyone has to lie (ctd).

[Lecture 10] [incorporated into lectures 9 and 11].

Lecture 11. ‘We;’ Category-bound activities, ‘Stereotypes’.

Lecture 12. Category-bound activities; Programmatic relevance; Hinting; Being ‘phoney’.

Lecture 13. Category-bound activities ""The baby cried;"" Praising, warning, and challenging; Tautological proverbs.

Lecture 14. ‘Cover’ categories; Omni-relevance.

Lecture 15.1. ‘Safe’ compliments and complaints.

Lecture 15.2. Ultra-rich topics.

Lecture 16. Possessables and possessitives.

Lecture 17. Claiming possession; Emblems; Pro-terms and performatives; Utterance positioning.

[Lecture 18] [Paradoxes]..

Part V Spring 1967.

[Lecture 1-7] [‘One party speaks at a time’].

Lecture 8. ""Everyone has to lie"".

Lecture 9. ""Everyone has to lie"" (ctd).

[Lecture 10] [incorporated into lectures 9 and 11].

Lecture 11. ‘We;’ Category-bound activities; Stereotypes’.

Lecture 12. Category-bound activities; Programmatic relevance; Hinting; Being ‘phoney’.

Lecture 13. Category-bound activities: ""The baby cried;"" Praising, warning, and challenging; Tautological proverbs.

Lecture 14. ‘Cover’ categories; Omni-relevance.

Lecture 15.1. ‘Safe’ compliments and complaints.

Lecture 15.2 Ultra-rich topics.

Lecture 16. Possessables and possessitives.

Lecture 17. Claiming possession; Emblems; Pro-terms and performatives; Utterance positioning.

[Lecture 18] [Paradoxes]..

Part VI Fall 1967.

General Introduction.

Lecture 1. The speaker sequencing problem.

Lecture 2. The ‘one-at-a-time rule; Violations; Complaints; Gossip.

Lecture 3. Bases for ‘interruption’.

Lecture 4. Utterance completion; Co-producing an utterance; Appendor clauses.

Lecture 5. Utterance completion; Action sequencing; Appendor questions.

Lecture 6. Next-speaker selection techniques; Paired utterances.

Lecture 7. Intentional mis-address; Floor seekers.

Lecture 8. Pre-sequences.

Lecture 9. Paradoxes.

Lecture 10. ‘Everyone gets a chance to talk’.

Lecture 011. Pronouns.

Lecture 11. Tying techniques.

Lecture 12. Repetition tying; ""A green?"" … ""Who’s Wayne Morse?"".

Lecture 13. Tying-based mis-hearings; Locational tying; Pro-verbs and performatives.

Lecture 14. Paraophrasing; Alternative temporal references; Approximate and precise numbers; Laughter; ‘Uh huh’..

Part VII Spring 1968.

April 17. Topic.

April 24. Second Stories.

May 8. Reason for a call; Tellability.

May 22. Pauses in spelling and numbering.

May 29. Verb selection; Interactionally generated invitations; Adequacy of local environments, etc.

Appendix I. ‘Introduction’ 1965.

Bibliography.

Index..

* This is the first publication in book form of the work which founded conversation analysis and which has had a profound influence on sociolinguistics and sociology.