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Limb X-Ray Interpretation

Limb X-Ray Interpretation

Dorthe Larsen, Peter Morris

ISBN: 978-1-861-56499-3

Feb 2006

236 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$95.99

Description

Limb X-Ray Interpretation provides a comprehensive guide to limb X-ray trauma diagnosis. The content is separated into two distinct parts; part I addresses the technical and professional issues in trauma radiography, from the initial request for an examination to the final image, including the normal and abnormal appearance of bone on radiographs and the classifications of fractures. Part II is subdivided into distinct anatomical regions by chapter describing a systematic approach to the interpretation of X-ray images.

Each chapter follows a similar format with core anatomy linked to the normal radiographic anatomy, using over 570 X-ray images and line drawings. The common and less common fractures, together with specific radiological signs of abnormalities, mechanism of injury and subsequent treatments are presented.

This book is of of great value to Emergency Nurse Practitioners, Accident and Emergency staff, radiographers, junior doctors, medical students, and physiotherapists.

Foreword (Ashis Banerjee).

Preface.

Acknowledgements.

PART 1 TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL ISSUES.

Chapter 1 The basic principles of radiology.

Chapter 2 Professional issues in radiography.

Chapter 3 The normal and abnormal appearance of bone on radiographs.

PART 11 THE RADIOLOGY OF THE ANATOMICAL REGIONS.

Chapter 4 The shoulder and proximal humerus.

Chapter 5 The distal humerus and elbow.

Chapter 6 The forearm and wrist.

Chapter 7 The hand and fingers.

Chapter 8 The knee joint and distal femur.

Chapter 9 The ankle joint and hind-foot.

Chapter 10 The fore-foot and toes.

Chapter 11 Self-test quiz.

Glossary.

References.

Index.

"This very affordable book will be a welcome addition to any medical library in an Accident and Emergency department or Minor Injuries unit, and can be used as an essential daily reference guide for clinicians." (RAD Magazine, January 2007)