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Low Emission Power Generation Technologies and Energy Management

Low Emission Power Generation Technologies and Energy Management

Jean-Claude Sabonnadière (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-848-21136-0

Nov 2009

480 pages

In Stock

$197.00

Description

This title is dedicated to energy storage, low emission technologies and energy management, with discussions on the future of nuclear energy, combined heat and power, using hydrogen as an energy vector and fuel cells, as well as chapters on energy saving and control of the demand for power.

Preface xiii

Chapter 1. Energy Storage: Applications to the Electricity Vector 1
Yves BRUNET

1.1. Energy density 1

1.2. Storage problem 4

1.3. Types of storage 14

1.4. Bibliography 48

Chapter 2. Nuclear Fission, Today and Tomorrow: from “Renaissance” to Technological Breakthroughs 51
Georges VAN GOETHEM

2.1. Introduction: all energy options kept open in 2006 Green Book 52

2.2. Nuclear energy: 50 years of industrial experience 54

2.3. Main actors: common needs, international vision and strategic instruments 61

2.4. On the eve of a technological breakthrough: six challenges for research and development 64

2.5. Generation II: supply security and environmental protection 69

2.6. Generation III: continuous improvements in safety and competitiveness 71

2.7. Generation IV (2030 forecast): technological breakthroughs in competitiveness and sustainability 76

2.8. Education and training: main objectives (modules, mutual recognition, and mobility) 94

2.9. Conclusion: nuclear energy – a part of the solution in a sustainable energy mix 95

2.10. Bibliography 97

20.11. List of acronyms 98

Chapter 3. Co-generation 101
William D’HAESELEER and Patrick LUICKX

3.1. Co-generation 101

3.2. Overview of existing technologies 106

3.3. Co-generation installation dimensioning 112

3.4. Assessment of the energy advantage of co-generation 115

3.5. Energy advantage allocation 124

3.6. The electrical aspects of co-generation installations 128

3.7. Cooling by absorption and tri-generation 132

3.8. Estimation of the potential of co-generation 133

3.9. Influence of co-generation on the environment 135

3.10. Conclusions and perspectives 136

3.11. Bibliography 137

Chapter 4. Hydrogen: An Energy Vector 139
Thierry ALLEAU

4.1. Context 139

4.2. Hydrogen: an energy vector for the future? 141

4.3. How do we produce hydrogen? 143

4.4. Hydrogen transportation 151

4.5. Distribution 153

4.6. Hydrogen storage 155

4.7. Applications of hydrogen as energy vector 160

4.8. Risks, standards, regulations and acceptability 166

4.9. A hydrogen economy 169

4.10. The hydrogen players 172

4.11. Conclusions and perspectives 175

4.12. Bibliography 176

Chapter 5. Fuel Cells 179
Pierre BAURENS, Pierre SERRE-COMBE, Jean-Philipe POIROT-CROUVEZIER

5.1. Introduction 179

5.2. Operation principles in different cell types 180

5.3. The system aspect 218

5.4. Energy conversion efficiency 234

5.5. Main applications 240

5.6. Bibliography 260

Chapter 6. Toward Energy Positive Buildings 263
Daniel QUENARD

6.1. Introduction 263

6.2. Energy and buildings: some key figures in Europe 264

6.3. How to move from buildings “addicted to fossil energy” toward“low energy buildings” (LEB) and, further, toward buildings as power plants (BaPP) 270

6.4. The Minergie trademark 300

6.5. The PassivHaus label (passive house) 306

6.6. The zero-energy houses: zero-energy house – zero-energy home (ZEH) – zero-energy buildings (ZEB) 313

6.7. The energy-positive house 319

6.8. Comparison of the three types of houses: Minergie, PassivHaus and ZEH 320

6.9. Beyond the positive-energy building 326

6.10. Bibliography 329

Chapter 7. Light Sources and Lighting: from Technology to Energy Savings 333
Georges ZISSIS

7.1. Lighting in the past and today 333

7.2. Light sources and energy conversion 340

7.3. Energy savings in the lighting field: some typical case studies 365

7.4. What is the future for light sources? 371

7.5. Bibliography 373

Chapter 8. Distributed Generation: Impact and Solutions 375
Raphaël CAIRE and Bertrand RAISON

8.1. Introduction: a threat or an opportunity? 375

8.2. Deregulation 376

8.3. New generation equipment 377

8.4. Impact of distributed generation on electric networks 391

8.5. Solution elements 396

8.6. Conclusion: a challenge and a development opportunity for the electricity sector 400

8.7. Bibliography 401

Chapter 9. Control of the Energy Demand: Network Load Shedding 405
Guillaume VERNEAU

9.1. Nomenclature 405

9.2. Introduction 406

9.3. Stakes of the load control 407

9.4. Choice of loads to control 412

9.5. Needs in communications, measurements and monitoring to control the loads 419

9.6. Model and algorithm needs for load control 428

9.7. Conclusion 439

9.8. Bibliography 439

List of authors 442

Index 445