Skip to main content

Making Dough: The 12 Secret Ingredients of Krispy Kreme's Sweet Success

Making Dough: The 12 Secret Ingredients of Krispy Kreme's Sweet Success

Kirk Kazanjian, Amy Joyner, Dick Clark (Foreword by)

ISBN: 978-0-471-68401-5

Mar 2004

240 pages

$21.99

Description

Praise for Making Dough

"I was enchanted, intrigued, and fascinated by every page of this book. Kirk Kazanjian, Amy Joyner, and Dick Clark (yes, that Dick Clark) have done a masterful job of storytelling in Making Dough. The book is inspirational, enlightening, and just plain great reading. In fact, it's great reading with sprinkles on it. What a yummy book!"
-Jay Conrad Levinson
Bestselling Author, Guerrilla Marketing series of books

"Krispy Kreme's success goes well beyond being a retail phenomenon. This book will show you what went on behind the scenes to build the company. Along the way, it will teach you how you can take a product that is seemingly counter-culture and turn it into an addictive brand."
-Phil Lempert
Author, Being the Shopper and Today show food trends editor

"Words can't do justice to Krispy Kreme doughnuts-just eat one! But as a fan of the product, it's interesting to read this business success story."
-Vince Gill
Singer/Songwriter

"You know what? You have absolutely no chance of starting the next Krispy Kreme! But, the lessons they learned and the insight they used to build their once-in-a-lifetime success are useful, practical, and powerful tactics that any business can benefit from."
-Seth Godin
Author, Purple Cow

"Take heart. You don't need a massive organization and a massive advertising budget to build a powerful brand. This interesting book by Kirk Kazanjian and Amy Joyner tells how Krispy Kreme did it on a shoestring."
-Al Ries
Coauthor, The Fall of Advertising and the Rise of PR

"I think it's safe to say that just about every company would love to know the secret ingredients of Krispy Kreme's sweet success. After all, it doesn't advertise, it is a revered member of the community, and it keeps growing like crazy. What an extraordinary business! Without doubt, you should pay attention to what Krispy Kreme is doing, especially if you want to prosper in today's competitive world."
-From the Foreword by Dick Clark
Producer, Entertainer, and Krispy Kreme Franchisee
Foreword.

Introduction.

1. Mix Good Taste with Show Business.

2. Be Picky About Your Partners.

3. Make Good Use of Your Time and Resources.

4. Expand and Protect Your Brand.

5. Think Big, but Grow Carefully.

6. Be a Guerrilla Marketer with a Soft Touch.

7. Maintain High Standards.

8. Harness the Power of Technology.

9. Give Back to the Community.

10. Select, Treat, and Train Your Employees Well.

11. Build on Your Success.

12. Keep Them Coming Back.

Milestones Krispy Kreme History.

Acknowledgments.

Notes.

Index.

Although it began humbly in 1937, Krispy Kreme and its 300 retail outlets in America sell more than two billion doughnuts a year. Seeking the secrets of Krispy Kreme's enormous success, Kazanjian and Joyner, both business writers, offer a tantalizing taste of the corporate strategies that have established the company's reputation. Drawing on interviews with company employees, business professors and customers, the authors discover that the recipe for Krispy Kreme's sweet success contains 12 major ingredients, such as "mix good taste with show business," "maintain high standards," "expand and protect your brand" and "give back to the community." As the authors point out, the company has very shrewdly customize its stores down to the windows that provide an opportunity to watch the process of doughnut making. Such tactics draw customers into the baking experience itself and make them feel like part of the larger Krispy Kreme "family." The authors also point out that Krispy Kreme has depended primarily on word of mouth, good community relations and repeat business to promote their products. In order to ensure quality, Krispy Kreme puts applicants for franchises through an elaborate screening process, often refusing even seasoned fast food franchisees because they do not fit the company's image. While the authors repeat many of the same stories far too often and sometimes sugar over the company's faults, they have written an enjoyable profile of one of America's most loved companies. (Oct.) (Publishers Weekly, August 18, 2003)

Customer loyalty plays a big role in the success of any company, and given that Krispy Kreme's fans are legion, it makes sense that Kazanjian (Value Investing with the Masters) and Joyner (News & Record magazine) relate stories of the die-hard donut lovers in this comprehensive history. The authors go back to the company's founding in 1937, purchase by Beatrice Foods in 1976, subsequent purchase in 1982 by franchise owners, and IPO in 2000, covering topics such as growth, marketing, employee turnover, and philanthropic efforts. Since going public. Krispy Kreme has embarked on a more aggressive expansion campaign, and the authors outline the rigorous screening that potential franchise developers must go through. Along the way, Krispy Kreme has diversified by acquiring a coffee-roasting company and a line of bakeries. The last part of the book includes a company time line as well as notes. Recommended for all libraries, especially those in North Carolina, where the company has its headquarters. (Index not seen.) —Stacey Marien. American Univ. Lib. Washington, DC (Library Journal, September 1, 2003)