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Meta-Regression Analysis: Issues of Publication Bias in Economics

Meta-Regression Analysis: Issues of Publication Bias in Economics

Colin Roberts (Editor), T. D. Stanley (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-13799-7

Jan 2006, Wiley-Blackwell

256 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$41.95

Description

This volume celebrates the innovative and rapidly growing area of economic research known as meta-regression analysis (MRA).

  • Shows how MRA enables researchers to make sense of disparate economic findings on the same subject.
  • Develops methods that help researchers to distinguish publication selection from genuine empirical effect.
  • Applies these methods to topical areas of economic research including: the effect of immigration on wages, minimum wage on unemployment, and gender on salaries.
  • Helps to bridge the gulf between economic theory and practice.
  • Written to be accessible to readers with a basic background in empirical economics.
1. Issues in Meta-Regression Analysis: An Overview: Colin J. Roberts.

2. Meta-Regression Analysis: A Quantitative Method of Literature Surveys: T. D. Stanley and Stephen B. Jarrell.

3. Beyond Publication Bias: T. D. Stanley.

4. A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Common Currencies on International Trade: Andrew K. Rose and T. D. Stanley.

5. Publication Bias in the Economic Freedom and Economic Growth Literature: Chris Doucouliagos.

6. A Meta-Analysis of b-Convergence: the Legendary 2%: Maria Abreu, Henri L. F. de Groot and Raymond J. G. M. Florax.

7. The Last Word on the Wage Curve?: Peter Nijkamp and Jacques Poot.

8. A Meta-Analytic Assessment of the Effect of Immigration on Wages: Simonetta Longhi, Peter Nijkamp and Jacques Poot.

9. A Meta-Analysis of the International Gender Wage Gap: Doris Weichselbaumer and Rudolf Winter-Ebmer.

10. The Income Elasticity of Money Demand: A Meta-Analysis of Empirical Results: Markus Knell and Helmut Stix.


  • A series of surveys celebrating the innovative and rapidly growing area of economic research known as meta-regression analysis (MRA).
  • Shows how MRA enables researchers to make sense of disparate economic findings on the same subject.
  • Develops methods that help researchers to distinguish publication selection from genuine empirical effect.
  • Applies these methods to topical areas of economic research including: the effect of immigration on wages, minimum wage on unemployment, and gender on salaries.
  • Helps to bridge the gulf between economic theory and practice.
  • Written to be accessible to readers with a basic background in empirical economics.