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Nationalism in Asia: A History Since 1945

Nationalism in Asia: A History Since 1945

Jeff Kingston

ISBN: 978-0-470-67302-7

Jun 2016

326 pages

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$34.95

Description

Using a comparative, interdisciplinary approach, Nationalism in Asia analyzes currents of nationalism in five contemporary Asian societies: China, India, Indonesia, Japan, and South Korea.

  • Explores the ways in which nationalism is expressed, embraced, challenged, and resisted in contemporary China, India, Indonesia, Japan, and South Korea using a comparative, interdisciplinary approach
  • Provides an important trans-national and trans-regional analysis by looking at five countries  that span Northeast, Southeast, and South Asia
  • Features comparative analysis of identity politics, democracy, economic policy, nation branding, sports, shared trauma, memory and culture wars, territorial disputes, national security and minorities
  • Offers an accessible, thematic narrative written for non-specialists, including a detailed and up-to-date bibliography
  • Gives readers an in-depth understanding of the ramifications of nationalism in these countries for the future of Asia

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Acknowledgements vii

Maps viii

Introduction xv

Part I National Identity 1

1 The Idea of Nation 3

2 Contemporary Culture Wars and National Identity 16

3 Nation Branding Confronts Troubling Realities 39

Part II Political Economy and Spectacle 57

4 Economic Nationalism 59

5 Democracy and Nationalism 88

6 Sports Nationalism 118

Part III Shackles of the Past 145

7 Chosen and Unchosen Traumas 147

8 Museums and Memorials 170

9 Textbook Nationalism and Memory Wars 196

Part IV Flashpoints and Fringes 217

10 Nationalism and Territorial Disputes 219

11 Nationalism and the Fringes 243

Select Bibliographical Guide to Nationalisms in Asia 273

Index 303

A ""measured, beautifully written book....Kingston's fine survey asks us to ponder [nationalism's] strengths and dangers, and reminds us to be careful of the 'politicians and polemicists' who enthusiastically hawk it."" - David McNeill, The Japan Times