Skip to main content

New Philosophies of Learning

New Philosophies of Learning

Ruth Cigman (Editor), Andrew Davis (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-19564-5

Jun 2009, Wiley-Blackwell

352 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$34.95

Description

Through a collection of contributions from an international team of empirical researchers and philosophers, New Philosophies of Learning signals the need for a sharper critical awareness of the possibilities and problems that the recent spate of innovative learning techniques presents.
  • Explores some of the many contemporary innovations in approaches to learning, including neuroscience and the focus on learners’ well-being and happiness
  • Debates the controversial approaches to categorising learners such as dyslexia
  • Raises doubts about the preoccupation with quasi-mathematical scrutiny and the neglect of ethical reflection about education
  • Discusses the possible grounds for concern, without exaggerating their similarities or offering sweeping judgements
  • Includes contributions from empirical researchers and philosophers, including Usha Goswami, Howard Gardner, Julian Elliott, David Bakhurst, John White and Christopher Winch 
Notes on Contributors.

Preface (Paul Standish).

Part I: Neuroscience, Learner Categories and ICT.

Section 1: Brain-based Learning.

1.1. Introduction (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

1.2. Philosophical Challenges for Researchers at the Interface between Neuroscience and Education (Paul Howard-Jones).

1.3. Principles of Learning, Implications for Teaching: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective (Usha Goswami).

1.4. Exercising Quality Control in Interdisciplinary Education: Toward an
Epistemologically Responsible Approach (Zachary Stein, Michael Connell and Howard Gardner).

1.5. Minds, Brains and Education (David Bakhurst).

1.6. Commentary (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

Section 2: Learner Categories.

2.1. Introduction (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

2.2. Ian Hacking, Learner Categories and Human Taxonomies (Andrew Davis).

2.3. Like Alligators Bobbing for Poodles? A Critical Discussion of Education,
ADHD and the Biopsychosocial Perspective (Paul Cooper).

2.4. Does Dyslexia Exist? (Julian G. Elliott and Simon Gibbs).

2.5. Thoughts About the Autism Label: A Parental View (Charlotte Moore).

2.6. Commentary (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

Section 3: ICT and Learning.

3.1. Introduction (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

3.2. Technology-Enhanced Learning: A Question of Knowledge (Jan Derry).

3.3. Technology-Enhanced Learning as a Tool for Pedagogical Innovation (Diana Laurillard).

Part II: Learning and Human Flourishing.

Section 4: The Enhancement Agenda.

4.1. Introduction (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

4.2. Enhancing Children (Ruth Cigman).

4.3. The Long Slide to Happiness (Richard Smith).

4.4. Lessons from a New Science? On Teaching Happiness in Schools (Judith Suissa).

4.5. A Critique of Positive Psychology—or ‘The New Science of Happiness’ (Alistair Miller).

Section 5: Non-Cognitive Intelligences.

5.1. Introduction (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

5.2. Illusory Intelligences? (John White)

5.3. Emotional Intelligence as Educational Goal: A Case for Caution (Sophie Rietti).

5.4. Commentary (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

Section 6: Learners, Teachers and Reflection.

6.1. Introduction (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

6.2. Learning How to Learn: A Critique (Christopher Winch).

6.3. Philosophy with Children, the Stingray and the Educative Value of
Disequilibrium (Karin Saskia Murris).

6.4. From Schools to Learning Environments: The Dark Side of Being
Exceptional (Maarten Simons and Jan Masschelein).

6.5. Commentary (Ruth Cigman and Andrew Davis).

Index.

  • Explores aspects of some contemporary innovations in approaches to learning, including neuroscience and the focus on learners’ well-being and happiness
  • Debates the controversial approaches to categorising learners such as dyslexia
  • Raises doubts about the preoccupation with quasi-mathematical scrutiny and the neglect of ethical reflection about education
  • Discusses the possible grounds for concern, without exaggerating their similarities or offering sweeping judgements
  • Includes contributions from empirical researchers and philosophers, including Usha Goswami, Howard Gardner, Julian Elliott, David Bakhurst, John White and Christopher Winch