Skip to main content

Partners In Health, Partners In Crime: Exploring the Boundaries of Criminology and Sociology of Health and Illness

Partners In Health, Partners In Crime: Exploring the Boundaries of Criminology and Sociology of Health and Illness

Stefan Timmermans (Editor), Jonathan Gabe (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-10539-2

Mar 2003, Wiley-Blackwell

200 pages

Select type: Paperback

Out of stock

$42.95

Description

This book brings together papers on the border between crime and health care in order to examine questions of interest to both criminologists and medical sociologists.

  • Brings together papers on the border between crime and health care.
  • Considers the work of forensic health care providers, law enforcement agents and policy makers.
  • Explores the medical component of crime and the legal status of medicine.
  • Questions authority, expertise, social control, legitimacy, and credibility within criminology and medical sociology.
Notes on Contributors.

1. Introduction: Connecting Criminology and Sociology of Health and Illness: Stefan Timmermans and Jonathan Gabe.

2. Towards Generous Constraint: Freedom and Coercion in a French Addiction Treatment: Emilie Gomart.

3. The Cause of Death Vs. the Gift of Life: Boundary Maintenance and the Politics of Expertise in Death Investigation: Stefan Timmermans.

4. Violence Against Doctors: A Medical(ised) Problem? The Case of National Health Service General Pracitioners: Mary Ann Elston, Jonathan Gabe, David Denney, Raymond Lee and Maria O'Beirne.

5. The Emergence and Implications of a Mental Health Ethos in Juvenile Justice: Sarah Armstrong.

6. Contesting the Text: Canadian Media Depictions of the Conflation of Mental Illness and Criminality: Riley Olstead.

7. Actor Networks, Policy Networks and Personality Disorder: Nick Manning.

8. Temporarily Insane: Pathologising Cultural Difference in American Criminal Courts: Sita Reddy.

Index.


  • Brings together papers on the border between crime and health care.

  • Considers the work of forensic health care providers, law enforcement agents and policy makers.

  • Explores the medical component of crime and the legal status of medicine.

  • Questions authority, expertise, social control, legitimacy, and credibility within criminology and medical sociology.