Skip to main content

Physics of Solar Planetary Environments: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Solar-Terrestrial Physics, June 7 - 18,1976, Boulder, Colorado, Volume 1

Physics of Solar Planetary Environments: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Solar-Terrestrial Physics, June 7 - 18,1976, Boulder, Colorado, Volume 1

Donald J. Williams (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-118-66904-4

Mar 2013, American Geophysical Union

510 pages

Select type: O-Book

Description

Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Special Publications Series.

The International Symposium on Solar-Terrestrial Physics held in Boulder, Colorado on June 7-18, 1976, was an attempt to critically look at energy, momentum, and mass transfer processes throughout the solar system as well as an attempt to bring together for a two-week period active researchers throughout most aspects of solar system physics. The meeting was sponsored by the American Geophysical Union and co-sponsored by the IUGG/IAGA, COSPAR and SCOSTEP. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the University of Colorado and the University of Denver hosted the meeting.

The meeting was attended by 428 registrants representing 22 countries. A list of registrants, as well as the final program of invited speakers are enclosed for reference purposes.

FOREWARD  xi

INTRODUCTION  xiii

INVITED REVIEW PAPERS AND INVITED PAPERS - VOLUME I

IS-I SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL SYSTEM-SOLAR CYCLE MANIFESTATIONS

SOLAR CYCLE REVIEW (GENERAL ASPECTS)
S.-I. Akasofu, University of Alaska  1

PHENOMENOLOGICAL UNDERSTANDING OF THE SOLAR CYCLE
Robert Howard, Hale Observatories  34

SOLAR CYCLE MANIFESTATIONS IN THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM
Herbert S. Bridge, Massachusetts Institute of Technology  47

SOLAR CYCLE MANIFESTATIONS IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE-UPPER ATMOSPHERE SYSTEM
Bengt Hultqvist, Kiruna Geophysical Institute  63

TS-I SOLAR DYNAMICS AND MODULATION OF SOLAR PHOTON AND PARTICLE FLUX

MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE
Jacques M. Beckers, Sacramento Peak Observatory  89

THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF CORONAL HOLES
J. D. Bohlin, E. O. Hulbert Center for Space Research, Naval Research Laboratory  114

DEVELOPMENT OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS
Zdenek Svestka, American Science & Engineering, Inc.  129

THE SOLAR FLARE PHENOMENON
E. R. Priest, The University, St. Andrews, Scotland 144

ANALOGIES OF SOLAR FLARES AND MAGNETOSPHERIC STORMS
Tatsuzo Obayashi, University of Tokyo  170

SOLAR FLARE X-RAY AND EUV EMISSION: A TERRESTRIAL VIEWPOINT
Richard F. Donnelly, NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory  178

RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL PHENOMENA AND SOLAR FLARES
S. F. Smerd, CSIRO, Australia  193

SOLAR PARTICLE EMISSION
E. C. Roelof, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory  214

IS-2 ENERGY TRANSFER PROCESSES IN NATURAL PLASMAS

DIFFUSION PROCESSES IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS
D. B. Melrose, The Australian National University  232

LABORATOREYX PERIMENTS( PLASMAI NTRUSION INTO THE MAGNETIC FIELD)
I. M. Podgorny, Space Research Institute, Academy of Sciences, USSR  241

INTERPRETATION OF LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS OF INTEREST TO 5PACE PHYSICS
Lars P. Block, The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden  255

TS-2 INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM-PROPAGATION OF THE SOLAR OUTPUT THROUGHOUT THE SOLAR SYSTEM

FLOW OF MASS AND ENERGY IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM
W. I. Axford, Max-Planck-lnstitut fur Aeronomie  270

M-REGION PHENOMENA
L. F. Burlaga, Goddard 5pace Flight Center, NASA  280

TRANSIENT PHENOMENA IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND
J. T. Gosling, University of California, Los A1amos Scientific Laboratory  286

SOLAR WIND OBSERVATIONS THROUGHOUT THE SOLAR SYSTEM
Michael D. Montgomery, Max-P1anck-lnstitut fur Physik and Astrophysik  304

PRELIMINARY RESULT5 OF HELIOS PLASMA MEASUREMENTS
H. Rosenbauer, H. Miggenrieder, M. Montgomery, R. 5chwenn, Max-Planck Institute  319

MARINER 10 INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELD RESULTS
K. W. Behannon, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA  332

THE INTERPLANETARY MEDIUM AT LARGE HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCES:
PIONEERS 10' AND 11'
Edwin J. Smith, Jet Propulsion Laboratory John N. Wolfe, Ames Research Center  340

ENERGETIC PARTICLES THROUGHOUT SOLAR SYSTEH
G. Wibberenz, Institut fur Reine und Angewandte Kernphysik, Universitat Kiel, FRG  346

OUR QUANTITATIVE UNDERSTANDING OF THE CORONAL EXPANSION
Thomas E. Nolzer, High Attitude Observatory, NCAR  366

THE INTERNAL PLASMA STATE OF THE HIGH SPEED SOLAR WIND AT 1AU
W. C. Feldman, B. Abraham-Shrauner, J. R. Asbridge, S. J. Bame University of California, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  413

THE INFLUENCE OF CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE SOLAR WIND
G. W. Pneuman, High Altitude Observatory, NCAR  428

LATITUDINAL VARIATIONS IN THE SOLAR WIND
S. T. Suess, NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory  443

THE SOLAR WIND--WHAT NEXT?
Thomas Gold, Cornell University  459

IS-3 PLASMA BOUNDARV LAVERS AND SHOCKS

COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS
A. A. Galeev, Space Research Institute, Academy of Sciences, USSR  464

PLASMA  BOUNDARIES  IN SPACE
Michael Schulz, The Aerospace Corporation  491

HYDROMAGNETIC TURBULENCE ASSOCIATED WITH PLASMA DISCONTINUITIES
Akira Hasegawa and Kinioki Mima, Bell Laboratories  505

VOLUME  II

TS-3 DVNAMICS OF THE EARTH'S MAGNETOSPHERE-IONOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE SYS EM

A SUMMARY OF OBSERVATIONS OF THE EARTH'S BOW SHOCK
D. H. Fairfield, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA  511

RECONNEXION
C. T. Russell, University of Californi& at Los Angeles  526

MAGNETOPAUSE AND BOUNDARY LAYER
Bengt U. O. Sonnerup, Dartmouth College  541

THE MAGNETOTAIL: ITS GENERATION AND DISSIPATION
Edward W. Hones, Jr., University of California, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory  558

FIELD AND PARTICLE OBSERVATIONS IN THE MAGNETOTAIL RELATED TO THE RECONNECTION PROCESS
A. Nishida, University of Tokyo  572

ENERGY TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION
S. W. H. Cowley, Imperial College, London  582

INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MAGNETOSPHERIC PHENOMENA: DEPENDENCE OF POLAR CAP MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE NORTHWARD COMPONENOTF THE IMF
Kiyoski Maezawa, University of Tokyo  608

CONVECTION
M. Harel, R. A. Wolf, Rice University  617

MAGNETOSPHERIC INSTABILITIES
Richard M. Thorn, University of California at Los Angeles

THE MAGNETOSPHERE-IONOSPHERE SYSTEM
V. Vasyliunas, Max-Planck-Institute

THE DYNAMICS OF THE IONOSPHERE AND UPPER ATMOSPHERE
J. V..Evans, M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory  630

THE COLD PLASMA THROUGHOUT THE MAGNETOSPHERE
K. I. Gringauz, Space Research Institute, Academy of Sciences, USSR  672

HOT PLASMAS IN THE EARTH'S MAGNETOSPHERE
L. A. Frank, The University of Iowa  685

RING CURRENT LOSS MECHANISMS AND COMPOSITION AS INFERRED FROM EQUATORIAL PITCH ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS OBSERVED DURING A STORM RECOVERY PHASE
Lawrence R. Lyons, NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory  701

ION COMPOSITION
Theodore A. Fritz, NOAA Space Environment Laboratory  716

THE ACCELERATION OF CHARGED PARTICLES AT LOW ALTITUDES
David S. Evans, NOAA Space Environment Laboratory  730

SUBSTORM EFFECTS OBSERVED IN THE AURORAL PLASMA
J. L. Burch, S. A. Fields, R. A. Heel is Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA  740

ELECTROSTATIC TURBULENCE IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE
Donald A. Gurnett, The University of Iowa  760

THE ROLE OF MANMADE VLF SIGNALS AND NOISE IN WAVE-PARTICLE INTERACTIONS IN THE MAGNETOSPHERE
C. G. Park, Stanford University  772

HYDROMAGNETIC WAVES.
L. J. Lanzerotti, Bell Laboratories  784

IS-4 ORIGIN OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THROUGHOU THE SOLAR SYSTEM

LARGE-SCALE PLASMA PROCESSES IN THE SOLAR SYSTEM
K. Schindler, Ruhr-Universitat B ochum, FRG  798

THE MAGNETIC FIELDS OF PLANETS
E. N. Parker, University of Chicago  812

TS-4 DYNAMICS OF PLANETARY MAGNETOSPHERE-IONOSPHERE SYSTEMS

JUPITER'S DISTANT ENVIRONMENT
M. G. Kivelson, University of California at Los Angeles  836

THE INNER MAGNETOSPHERE OF JUPITER
W. Fillius, University of California at San Diego

MARS-PLASMA ENVIRONMENT
O. L. Vaisberg, Space Research Institute, USSR  854

THE MAGNETOSPHEROEF MARS
Sh. Sh. Dolginov, Academy of Science, USSR  872

INTERACTION OF THE SOLAR WIND WITH VENUS
R. E. Hattie, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA  889

ION FLUX PARAMETERS IN THE SOLAR WIND -VENUS INTERACTION REGION ACCORDING TO VENERA-9  AND VENERA-10 DATA
O. L. Vaisberg, S. A. Romanov, V. N. Smirnov, I. P. Karpinsky, B. I. Khazanov, B. V. Polenov, A. V. Bogdanov and N.M. Antonov Space Research Institute, USSR  904

PLASMA OBSERVATIONS NEAR VENUS ON BOARD THE VENERA 9 AND 10 SATELLITES BY MEANS OF WIDE-ANGLE PLASMA DETECTORS
K. I. Gringauz, V. V. Bezrukikh, T. K. Breus, T. Gombosi, A. P. Remozov, M. I. Verigin and G. I. Volkov
Space Research Institute, USSR  918

MAGNETIC F IELD MEASUREMENTS AROUND VENUS
Sh. Sh. Dolginov, Ye. G. Yeroshenko, L. N. Zhugov, B. V. Busin, and V. A. Shatova, Academy of Sciences, USSR

THE MAGNETOSPHERE OF MERCURY
N. F. Ness, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA  933

IS-5 SOLAR TERRESTRIAL SYSTEM: LONG TERM VARIATIONS

HISTORY OF SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RELATIONS AS DEDUCED FROM
SPACECRAFT AND GEOMAGNETIC DATA: SOLAR M REGIONS
J. M. Wilcox, Stanford University  947

THE SUN SINCE THE BRONZE AGE
J. Eddy, High Altitude Observatory, NCAR  958

LONG-TERM ASPECTS OF MAGNETOSPHERIC VARIABILITY
G. L. Siscoe, University of CAlifornia at Los Angeles  973

TS-5 EFFECTS OF SOLAR TERRESTRIAL DYNAMICS ON MAN'S IMMEDIATE ENVIRONMENT

CAUSE-EFFECT INFERENCES IN GEOPHYSICAL STATISTICAL STUDIES
C. O. Hines, University of Toronto  1005

EVIDENCE OF SUN-WEATHER RELATIONS
L. Svalgaard, Stanford University  1012

SOLAR-WEATHESRT UDIES--PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS
George C. Reid, NOAA  1036

SPACECRAFT CHARGING PROBLEMS
Alan Rosen, TRW Systems Group  1024