Skip to main content

Practical Medical Microbiology for Clinicians

Practical Medical Microbiology for Clinicians

Frank E. Berkowitz, Robert C. Jerris

ISBN: 978-1-119-06711-5

Dec 2015, Wiley-Blackwell

480 pages

$135.99

Description

Infectious diseases constitute a major portion of illnesses worldwide, and microbiology is a main pillar of clinical infectious disease practice. Knowledge of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites is integral to practice in clinical infectious disease.

Practical Medical Microbiology is an invaluable reference for medical microbiology instructors. Drs. Berkowitz and Jerris are experienced teachers in the fields of  infectious diseases and microbiology respectively, and provide expert insight into microorganisms that affect patients, how organisms are related to each other, and how they are isolated and identified in the microbiology laboratory. The text also is designed to provide clinicians the knowledge they need to facilitate communication with the microbiologist in their laboratory.

The text takes a systematic approach to medical microbiology, describing taxonomy of human pathogens and consideration of organisms within specific taxonomic groups. The text tackles main clinical infections caused by different organisms, and supplements these descriptions with clinical case studies, in order to demonstrate the effects of various organisms.

Practical Medical Microbiology is an invaluable resource for students, teachers, and researchers studying clinical microbiology, medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and virology.

Preface, ix

Acknowledgments, xi

Section I: Laboratory methods in clinical microbiology 1

1 Introduction 3

2 Microbiology laboratory methods 12

Section II: Prions and viruses 47

3 Prions 49

4 General virology 51

5 DNA viruses (excluding hepatitis B virus) 55

6 RNA viruses (excluding hepatitis viruses, arthropod‐borne viruses, and bat and rodent excreta viruses) 74

7 Hepatitis viruses 99

8 Arthropod‐borne viruses (arboviruses), hantaviruses, arenaviruses, and filoviruses 104

Section III: Bacteriology 121

9 Bacteriology 123

10 Gram‐positive cocci 141

11 Gram‐negative cocci 162

12 Gram‐positive rods 168

13 Gram‐negative rods 178

14 Anaerobic bacteria 205

15 Mycoplasmas, Chlamydiae, Rickettsiae, and Ehrlichiae 217

16 Spirochetes 229

17 Mycobacteria 243

Section IV: Mycology 259

18 Fungi 261

19 Yeasts 268

20 Dimorphic endemic fungi 277

21 Molds 289

Section V: Parasitology 303

22 Parasitology 305

23 Intestinal protozoa 312

24 Tissue and blood protozoa 328

25 Helminths 358

26 Ectoparasites 389

Section VI: Clinical cases 397

27 Cases 399

Section VII: Appendices 431

Appendix 1: Taxonomy of infectious agents infecting humans and lists of infectious agents according to their source 433

Appendix 2: Clinical syndromes and their causative organisms 449

Appendix 3: General references and online resources 455

Index 457