Skip to main content

Project Management in Construction, 6th Edition

Project Management in Construction, 6th Edition

Anthony Walker

ISBN: 978-1-118-50039-2

Jan 2015, Wiley-Blackwell

352 pages

$49.99

Description

As with all previous editions of Project Management in Construction, this sixth edition focuses on systems theory as the approach suitable for organizing and managing people skilled in the design and completion of construction projects. It discusses the many competing paradigms and alternative perspectives available, for example in relation to differentiation and integration, as well as the emerging study of temporary organizations and its relevance to construction project management.

Whilst encompassing the need to develop further theoretical aspects of construction project organization theory, this edition has also enhanced the application of organization studies to practical issues of construction project management. More emphasis has been placed on the added complexity of construction project management by issues surrounding clients and stakeholders, and the control and empowerment of project participants. Additional focus has been placed on sustainability issues as they impinge on construction project management, on reworked views on supply chain management and on developments in partnering, together with clarification of the shifting terms and definitions relating to construction organization structures and their uses.

Related Resources

Instructor

Request an Evaluation Copy for this title

Preface viii

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Evolution of Project Organisation 3

1.3 Management and Organisation 9

1.4 Definition of Construction Project Management 11

1.5 Objectives and Decisions 12

1.6 The Project Management Process and the Project Manager 12

1.7 Projects, Firms and Clients 14

1.8 The Contribution of Organisation Structure 18

1.9 Organisation Theory and Project Organisations 22

1.10 Relevance of Systems Theory 23

2 Organisation and the Construction Process 26

2.1 Introduction 26

2.2 The Classical Approach 27

2.3 The Behavioural Approach 30

2.4 The Socio-Technical Approach 32

2.5 The Systems Approach 33

2.6 Reconciling Diverse Approaches 42

2.7 Criticisms of the Systems Approach 44

2.8 Configuration Theory 45

2.9 Mintzberg’s Classification 46

2.10 Chaos and Complexity Theory 52

2.11 Postmodernism 56

2.12 Critical Theory 57

2.13 The Transaction Cost Approach 58

2.14 Many Paradigms 65

2.15 The Relevance of Temporary Organisations Generally to Construction Project Management 65

2.16 Virtual Organisation 68

2.17 Projects, Firms and Process 70

3 Systems Thinking and Construction Project Organisation 72

3.1 Introduction 72

3.2 Systems Concepts 76

3.3 Action of Environmental Forces 89

3.4 Negative Entropy, Adaption and Protected Environments 97

3.5 Growth, Differentiation, Interdependency and Integration 99

3.6 Feedback 101

3.7 Systems and Hierarchies 102

3.8 Increasing Challenges 104

3.9 Summary 105

4 Clients and Stakeholders 107

4.1 Introduction 107

4.2 Classification of Clients 114

4.3 Clients’ Objectives 120

4.4 Relationship of the Client’s Organisation and the Construction Process 123

4.5 Conflicting Objectives 126

4.6 Project Change 127

4.7 Role of the Client 128

4.8 Clients, Stakeholders and Sustainability 130

4.9 Practical Client Issues 132

5 The Project Team 139

5.1 Introduction 139

5.2 Firms and Project Teams 139

5.3 Relationship with the Client 144

5.4 Differentiation, Interdependency and Integration 145

5.5 Decisions and Their Effect on Structure 153

5.6 Differentiation and Integration in Practice 154

5.7 Organisational Culture 158

5.8 Partnering 163

5.9 Supply Chain Management 171

5.10 Trust Between Construction Organisations Generally 175

6 A Model of the Construction Process 178

6.1 Introduction 178

6.2 Common Characteristics 178

6.3 Subsystems 184

6.4 The Operating System and the Managing System 190

6.5 The Functions of the Managing System 191

6.6 Pattern of Managing System Functions 197

6.7 Project Management Activities 199

6.8 Project Management Skills 204

6.9 Some Practical Considerations 205

6.10 Design of Organisation Structures 207

7 Authority, Power and Politics 209

7.1 Introduction 209

7.2 Authority 209

7.3 Power 212

7.4 Relationship Between Authority and Power 212

7.5 The Sources of Power 213

7.6 Power and Interdependency 215

7.7 Politics in Organisations 215

7.8 Power and Leadership 218

7.9 Empowerment and Control 218

7.10 Power in Project Management 221

7.11 Politics, Projects and Firms 226

7.12 Empowerment and Projects 227

7.13 Project Managers and Power 229

8 Project Leadership 230

8.1 Introduction 230

8.2 Leadership 231

8.3 Some Research Models 232

8.4 Leadership Style 237

8.5 Transactional and Transformational Leadership 238

8.6 Leadership and the Project Manager 239

8.7 Project managers’ Perceptions 243

8.8 Leadership Qualities 245

9 Organisation Structures 248

9.1 Introduction 248

9.2 Project Management Theory and Transaction Cost Economics 249

9.3 The Components of Project Organisation Structures 257

9.4 Client/Project Team Integration 258

9.5 Design Team Organisation 259

9.6 Integration of the Construction Team 264

9.7 An Illustration of a Transaction Cost Explanation 275

9.8 Organisation Matrix 276

9.9 Public–Private Partnerships 288

9.10 Programme Management 291

10 Analysis and Design of Project Management Structures 295

10.1 Need for Analysis and Design 295

10.2 Criteria 296

10.3 Linear Responsibility Analysis and Other Techniques 296

10.4 Application of Linear Responsibility Analysis 297

10.5 Project Outcome 309

10.6 Presentation of Project Organisations 313

References 315

Index 336