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Psychology in Britain: Historical Essays and Personal Reflections

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$107.00

Psychology in Britain: Historical Essays and Personal Reflections

Geoff Bunn (Editor), A. D. Lovie (Editor), G. D. Richards (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-854-33332-2 April 2001 Wiley-Blackwell 496 Pages

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Description

Drawing on more than 25 contributions, this new book presents both a historical and personal account of British psychology over the last century. The book is divided into two sections: Part 1 contains a collection of historical essays concentrating on institutional beginnings, practical concerns, individual projects and post-war developments. Part 2 looks at the professional reminiscences of 12 senior psychologists.
List of tables and figures.

List of contributors.

Foreword.

Acknowledgements.

Introduction (Geoffrey C. Bunn).

Part I. Historical Essays.

1 Edward Cox, the Psychological Society of Great Britain (1875-1879) and the meanings of and institutional failure (Graham Richards).

2 A question of 'peculiar important': George Croom Robertson, Mind and the changing relationship between British psychology and philosophy (Francis Neary).

3 James Scully and scientific psychology, 1870-1910 (Lyubov G. Gurjeva).

4 Three steps to heaven: how the British Psychological Society attained its place in the sun (Sandy Lovie).

5 The popular, the practical and the professional: psychological identities in Britain, 1901-1950 (Mathew Thomson).

6 Psychology at war, 1914-1945 (Joanna Bourke).

7 The psychology of memory (Alan Collins).

8 Social psychology and social concern in 1930s Britain (Martin Roiser).

9 Pear and his peers (Alan Costall).

10 British psychology and psychoanalysis: the case of Susan Isaacs (Janet Sayers).

11 Physiology and psychology, or brain and mind, in the age of C.S. Sherrington (Roger Smith).

12 A 'precipitous degringolade'? The uncertain progress of British comparative psychology in the twentieth century (David Wilson).

13 Science in the clinic: clinical psychology at the Maudsley (Maarten Derksen).

14 'Our friends electric': mechanical models of mind in post-war Britain (Rhodri Hayward).

15 Behavioural approaches and the cultivation of competence (Karen Baistow).

Part II. Personal Reflections.

16 The development of social psychology in Oxford (Michael Argyle).

17 Memories of memory research (Alan Baddeley).

18 Purpose, personality, creativity: a computational adventure (Margaret A. Boden).

19 The joys of psychology (David C. Duncan).

20 The making of a psychologist: a late developer (Fay Fransella).

21 Adventures of a maverick (Richard L. Gregory).

22 The advent of the methodological critique (Ron Harré).

23 Crossing Cultures (Gustav Jahoda).

24 Taking people seriously: psychology as a listening ear (John and Elizabeth Newson).

25 The emergence of developmental psychopathology (Michael Rutter).

26 Creativity in research (Peter Wason).

Bibliography.

Index.

"stimulating and informative ... Readers of these essays and relections will learn much about the different ways that professional psychologists, past and present, have struggled with this mystery of the relationship between mind and body and how each should be scientifically investigated; how they have looked to engineering and technology for models of how the mind might be understood; and how they have sought to apply that understanding to the tasks of developing, educating, healing, controlling, predicting and simulating individual human minds." (Thomas Dixon, University of Cambridge, BJHS, Vol.36, September 2003)

"This volume ... does well to fill many gaps in the patchy record of British psychology, and will provide impetus to boot ... it boasts contributions from some of the finest historians on the British scene, and some of its most important practitioners ... I found most pieces to be high quality, and more than useful in several cases." (Roderick D. Buchanan, University of Groningen, Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, Vol.39(4), Fall 2003)


  • Drawing on more than 25 contributions, this new book presents both a historical and personal account of British psychology from 1875 to the present date.

  • Part 1 contains a collection of historical essays concentrating on institutional beginnings, practical concerns, individual projects and post-war developments.

  • Part 2 looks at the professional reminiscences of 12 senior psychologists and the 'implicit knowledge' that they leave to the next generation of psychologists.

  • Published in association with the Science Museum, this book is a celebration of the last century of British psychology, providing insights into how psychology as a discipline may evolve in the future.