Skip to main content

Quantum Mechanics: A Conceptual Approach

E-Book

$85.99

Quantum Mechanics: A Conceptual Approach

Hendrik F. Hameka

ISBN: 978-0-471-65479-7 April 2004 224 Pages

E-Book
$85.99
Paperback
$107.00
O-Book
Download Product Flyer

Download Product Flyer

Download Product Flyer is to download PDF in new tab. This is a dummy description. Download Product Flyer is to download PDF in new tab. This is a dummy description. Download Product Flyer is to download PDF in new tab. This is a dummy description. Download Product Flyer is to download PDF in new tab. This is a dummy description.

Description

A unique introductory text on quantum mechanics, from basic principles to historical perspective.
* Includes description of the historical developments that led to the discovery of QM, often left out of other textbooks.
* Emphasizes basic concepts that were essential in this discovery, placing them in context and making them more understandable to students.
* Written in an easy-to-understand style and assuming no prior knowledge of the topic, this book provides a solid foundation for future study of quantum chemistry.
* Includes problem sets for student use.
Preface.

1. The Discovery of Quantum Mechanics.

I Introduction.

II Planck and Quantization.

III Bohr and the Hydrogen Atom.

IV Matrix Mechanics.

V The Uncertainty Relations.

VI Wave Mechanics.

VII The Final Touches of Quantum Mechanics.

VIII Concluding Remarks.

2. The Mathematics of Quantum Mechanics.

I Introduction.

II Differential Equations.

III Kummer’s Function.

IV Matrices.

V Permutations.

VI Determinants.

VII Properties of Determinants.

VIII Linear Equations and Eigenvalues.

IX Problems.

3. Classical Mechanics.

I Introduction.

II Vectors and Vector Fields.

III Hamiltonian Mechanics.

IV The Classical Harmonic Oscillator.

V Angular Momentum.

VI Polar Coordinates.

VII Problems.

4. Wave Mechanics of a Free Particle.

I Introduction.

II The Mathematics of Plane Waves.

III The Schrödinger Equation of a Free Particle.

IV The Interpretation of the Wave Function.

V Wave Packets.

VI Concluding Remarks.

VII Problems.

5. The Schrödinger Equation.

I Introduction.

II Operators.

III The Particle in a Box.

IV Concluding Remarks.

V Problems.

6. Applications.

I Introduction.

II A Particle in a Finite Box.

III Tunneling.

IV The Harmonic Oscillator.

V Problems.

7. Angular Momentum.

I Introduction.

II Commuting Operators.

III Commutation Relations of the Angular Momentum.

IV The Rigid Rotor.

V Eigenfunctions of the Angular Momentum.

VI Concluding Remarks.

VII Problems.

8. The Hydrogen Atom.

I Introduction.

II Solving the Schrödinger Equation.

III Deriving the Energy Eigenvalues.

IV The Behavior of the Eigenfunctions.

V Problems.

9. Approximate Methods.

I Introduction.

II The Variational Principle.

III Applications of the Variational Principle.

IV Perturbation Theory for a Nondegenerate State.

V The Stark Effect of the Hydrogen Atom.

VI Perturbation Theory for Degenerate States.

VII Concluding Remarks.

VIII Problems.

10. The Helium Atom.

I Introduction.

II Experimental Developments.

III Pauli’s Exclusion Principle.

IV The Discovery of the Electron Spin.

V The Mathematical Description of the Electron Spin.

VI The Exclusion Principle Revisited.

VII Two-Electron Systems.

VIII The Helium Atom.

IX The Helium Atom Orbitals.

X Concluding Remarks.

XI Problems.

11 Atomic Structure.

I Introduction.

II Atomic and Molecular Wave Function.

III The Hartree-Fock Method.

IV Slater Orbitals.

V Multiplet Theory.

VI Concluding Remarks.

VII Problems.

12 Molecular Structure.

I Introduction.

II The Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

III Nuclear Motion of Diatomic Molecules.

IV The Hydrogen Molecular Ion.

V The Hydrogen Molecule.

VI The Chemical Bond.

VII The Structures of Some Simple Polyatomic Molecules.

VIII The Hückel Molecular Orbital Method.

IX Problems.

Index.

"…the treatment of individual topics and concepts is very good and informative…" (Journal of Chemical Education, January 2005)

"…this book serves as a skeletal summary of arguments presented in class...” (CHOICE, October 2004)