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Radio Frequency Identification and Sensors: From RFID to Chipless RFID

Radio Frequency Identification and Sensors: From RFID to Chipless RFID

Etienne Perret

ISBN: 978-1-848-21766-9

Dec 2014, Wiley-ISTE

360 pages

In Stock

$129.00

Description

This book deals with the field of identification and sensors, more precisely the possibility of collecting information remotely with RF waves (RFID). The book introduces the technology of chipless RFID starting from classical RFID and barcode, and explores the field of identification and sensors without wire, without batteries, without chip, and with tags that can even be printed on paper.

A technique for automatic design of UHF RFID tags is presented , aiming at making the tags as insensitive as possible to the environment (with the ability to increase the reading range reliability), or, conversely, making them sensitive in order to produce sensors, meanwhile keeping their unique ID. The RFID advantages are discussed, along with its numerous features, and comparisons with the barcode technology are presented. After that, the new chipless RFID technology is introduced on the basis of the previous conclusions. Original technological approaches are introduced and discussed in order to demonstrate the practical and economic potential of the chipless technology.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ix

LIST OF ACRONYMS  xi

INTRODUCTION xv

PART 1. RADIO-FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATIONS 1

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION TO RFID 3

1.1. General introduction to RFID  3

1.2. The RFID market 10

1.3. Issues in RFID  12

1.3.1. Robustness of reading  12

1.3.2. Tag prices  15

1.3.3. From identification toward sensor function 17

1.4. Conclusion 18

1.5. Bibliography  18

CHAPTER 2. ANTENNA DESIGN FOR UHF RFID TAGS 21

2.1. Introduction  21

2.2. Essential RFID parameters  21

2.2.1. Putting into equation of reader-tag links  24

2.3. Discussions about the two chip impedance states Zic 30

2.4. Rules of design for RFID antennas: classic design approach 33

2.4.1. Classic antenna design approach for passive UHF RFID tags 34

2.5. Robust RFID antenna design methodology 41

2.5.1. Context of study 41

2.5.2. Description of principle applied  41

2.5.3. Principle of co-simulation 42

2.5.4. Taking into account of the environment, design of robust tags 43

2.5.5. Use of the cosimulation principle in the optimization process 45

2.5.6. Generation of antenna forms 47

2.5.7. Application of the automated design tool via an example 50

2.6. Conclusion 56

2.7. Bibliography  57

CHAPTER 3. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN UHF RFID 61

3.1. Introduction  61

3.2. Wireless measurement technique for antenna impedance 62

3.2.1. Characterization of RFID chips and measurement of the two impedance states  64

3.2.2. Theoretical approach to input impedance extraction from a small antenna based on the use of an RFID chip 68

3.3. Toward the use of RFID as a sensor  79

3.3.1. Taking into account of downlink – increase of delta RCS 85

3.3.2. Example of an RFID sensor 90

3.4. Conclusion 92

3.5. Bibliography  93

PART 2. CHIPLESS RFID 97

CHAPTER 4. INTRODUCTION TO CHIPLESS RFID 99

4.1. Introduction  99

4.2. Operating principle of chipless RFID  101

4.2.1. Description of the principle of chipless RFID  104

4.2.2. Example of C-shaped tag  108

4.3. Positioning of chipless RFID  112

4.3.1. Latest developments 112

4.3.2. Frequential tag and temporal tag: definition  115

4.3.3. Applicative positioning  116

4.4. Advantages  119

4.4.1. Different ideas to take into consideration120

4.5. Conclusion 123

4.6. Bibliography  124

CHAPTER 5. DEVELOPMENT OF CHIPLESS RFID 127

5.1. Introduction  127

5.2. Coding capacity and density of chipless RFID tags 134

5.2.1. Performances of resonant patterns 135

5.2.2. Information coding techniques 136

5.2.3. Transmission and reception standards 137

5.3. Improvement of the robustness of detection of chipless RFID tags  139

5.3.1. REP approach (frequency domain) 142

5.3.2. Temporal approaches 153

5.4. Practical application of chipless RFID technology  164

5.4.1. Design of chipless RFID tags compatible with regulations 164

5.4.2. Cost of tags 165

5.4.3. Production of a reader for chipless technology 169

5.4.4. Chipless RFID at THz – the THID project 174

5.5. Conclusion 178

5.6. Bibliography  180

CHAPTER 6. PERSPECTIVES ON CHIPLESS RFID TECHNOLOGY 185

6.1. Introduction  185

6.2. Securing of information 186

6.3. Multiple readings 188

6.4. Chipless sensors 190

6.4.1. Humidity sensors 190

6.4.2. Deformation sensor 200

6.5. Reconfigurable chipless 208

6.5.1. Operating principle of CBRAM 209

6.5.2. Example of a reconfigurable chipless tag 211

6.6. Conclusion 216

6.7. Bibliography  217

CONCLUSION 223

INDEX 227