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Reading Ethics

Reading Ethics

Miranda Fricker (Editor), Samuel Guttenplan (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-12473-7

Sep 2008

344 pages

In Stock

$121.95

Description

This text encourages students to engage with key problems and arguments in ethics through a series of classic and contemporary readings.
  • This text encourages students to engage with ethical issues through a series of classic and contemporary readings
  • Readings are accompanied by interactive commentary from the editors
  • Inspires students to think about the nature of moral philosophy and to draw comparisons between different traditions
  • Themes include: the nature of goodness, subjectivity and objectivity, justice and virtue, moral motivation, moral obligation, and literature as moral philosophy
  • Readings range from Plato’s Republic to Rawls’ A Theory of Justice
Introduction.

1. Goodness.

Introduction.

Introduction to Aristotle.

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (extracts from Book I).

Commentary on Aristotle.

Introduction to Mill.

J. S. Mill, Utilitarianism (extracts from Ch. 2, ‘What Utilitarianism Is’).

Commentary on Mill.

Introduction to Foot.

Philippa Foot, ‘Utilitarianism and the Virtues’ (extracts).

Commentary on Foot.

2. Justice.

Introduction.

Introduction to Plato (and Socrates).

Plato, Republic (extracts from Books II–IV).

Commentary on Plato.

Introduction to Rawls.

John Rawls, A Theory of Justice (extracts from Ch.1, ‘Justice as Fairness’).

Commentary on Rawls.

3. Reasons for Action.

Introduction.

Introduction to Hume.

David Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature (extracts from II.III.iii, ‘Of the Influencing Motives of the Will’, and III.I.i, ‘Moral Distinctions Not Derived from Reason’).

Commentary on Hume.

Introduction to McDowell.

John McDowell, ‘Are Moral Requirements Hypothetical Imperatives?’ (extracts).

Commentary on McDowell.

4. Subjectivism and Objectivism.

Introduction to the Problem.

Introduction to Mackie.

J. L. Mackie, Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong (extracts from Ch.1, ‘The Subjectivity of Values’.

Commentary on Mackie.

Introduction to Nagel.

Thomas Nagel, The View from Nowhere (extracts from Ch. VIII, ‘Value’).

Commentary on Nagel.

5. Morality and Obligation.

Introduction to the Problem.

Introduction to Kant.

Immanuel Kant, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (extracts from Section II, ‘Transition from Popular Moral Philosophy to Metaphysics of Morals’).

Commentary on Kant.

Introduction to Williams.

Bernard Williams, Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy (extracts from Ch. 10, ‘Morality, the Peculiar Institution’).

Commentary on Williams.

6. Boundaries of Moral Philosophy.

Introduction to the Problem.

Introduction to Nussbaum.

Martha Nussbaum, Love’s Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature (extracts from essay 4, ‘Flawed Crystals: James’s The Golden Bowl and Literature as Moral Philosophy’).

Commentary on Nussbaum.

Introduction to Gaita.

Raimond Gaita, Good and Evil: An Absolute Conception (extracts from Ch. 4, ‘Remorse and Its Lessons’).

Commentary on Gaita.

Further Reading.

Index

"Reading Ethics is a highly original and creative approach to introducing ethics which not only encourages beginners to understand and think about primary sources, but will also challenge, renew and enliven the interest of experienced philosophers and their interpretation of familiar arguments. There is simply nothing else available that introduces primary works in a way so likely to capture the interest and imagination." Michael Lacewing, Heythrop College
  • This text encourages students to engage with ethical issues through a series of classic and contemporary readings
  • Readings are accompanied by interactive commentary from the editors
  • Inspires students to think about the nature of moral philosophy and to draw comparisons between different traditions
  • Themes include: the nature of goodness, subjectivity and objectivity, justice and virtue, moral motivation, moral obligation, and literature as moral philosophy
  • Readings range from Plato’s Republic to Rawls’ A Theory of Justice