Skip to main content

Reading the Modern British and Irish Novel 1890 - 1930

Reading the Modern British and Irish Novel 1890 - 1930

Daniel R. Schwarz

ISBN: 978-0-631-22622-2

Oct 2004

308 pages

In Stock

$41.95

Description

Daniel R. Schwarz has studied and taught the modern British novel for decades and now brings his impressive erudition and critical acuity to this insightful study of the major authors and novels of the first half of the twentieth century.

  • An insightful study of British fiction in the first half of the twentieth century.
  • Draws on the author’s decades of experience researching and teaching the modern British novel.
  • Sets the modern British novel in its intellectual, cultural and literary contexts.
  • Features close readings of Hardy’s Jude the Obscure, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim, Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers and The Rainbow, Joyce’s Dubliners and Ulysses, Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse and Forster’s A Passage to India.
  • Shows how these novels are essential components in a modernist cultural tradition which includes the visual arts.
  • Takes account of recent developments in theory and cultural studies.
  • Written in an engaging style, avoiding jargon.
Introduction: Reading the Modern British and Irish Novel.

1 “I Was the World in Which I Walked”: The Transformation of the British and Irish Novel, 1890-1930.

2 Hardy’s Jude the Obscure: The Beginnings of the Modern Psychological Novel.

3 Conrad’s Heart of Darkness: “We Live, as We Dream - Alone”.

4 Conrad’s Lord Jim: Reading Texts, Reading Lives.

5 Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers: Speaking of Paul Morel: Voice, Unity, and Meaning.

6 Lawrence’s The Rainbow: Family Chronicle, Sexual Fulfillment, and the Quest for Form and Values.

7 Joyce’s Dubliners: Moral Paralysis in Dublin.

8 Joyce’s Ulysses: The Odyssey of Leopold Bloom and Stephen Dedalus on June 16, 1904.

9 Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway: Sexual Repression, Madness, and Social Form.

10 Woolf’s To the Lighthouse: Choreographing Life and Creating Art as Time Passes.

11 Forster’s Passage to India: The Novel of Manners as Political Novel.

Notes.

Select Bibliography.

""[Schwarz's introductions] humanize texts that might otherwise seem too foreboding ... The broadly diverse sense of human interest that results can only dispel any contrary sense of modernism's exclusivity, difficulty or autonomy."" James Joyce Quarterly

  • An insightful study of British fiction in the first half of the twentieth century.

  • Draws on the author’s decades of experience researching and teaching the modern British novel.

  • Sets the modern British novel in its intellectual, cultural and literary contexts.

  • Features close readings of Hardy’s Jude the Obscure, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim, Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers and The Rainbow, Joyce’s Dubliners and Ulysses, Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse and Forster’s A Passage to India.

  • Shows how these novels are essential components in a modernist cultural tradition which includes the visual arts.

  • Takes account of recent developments in theory and cultural studies.

  • Written in an engaging style, avoiding jargon.