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Reconfigurable Mobile Radio Systems: A Snapshot of Key Aspects Related to Reconfigurability in Wireless Systems

Reconfigurable Mobile Radio Systems: A Snapshot of Key Aspects Related to Reconfigurability in Wireless Systems

Guillaume Vivier (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-905-20946-0

Jun 2007

238 pages

In Stock

$182.00

Description

Different aspects of the reconfigurability of mobile radio systems are analyzed in this book. These include services, object modeling applied to software radio, flexible spectrum management, trade-offs for building a reconfigurable terminal, an example of a pure software radio modem, adaptive MIMO techniques and analog-to-digital converters.

Introduction xiii

Chapter 1. Services and Adaptive Uses 1
Guillaume DORBES

1.1. New networks and new uses 1

1.1.1. Broadband mobile radio systems: why do it? 1

1.1.2. From Internet services on a voice network to voice services on an Internet network 2

1.1.3. From telephony to interpersonal communication 3

1.1.4. From charged to free: the value evolution 4

1.1.5. From the end-to-end controlled session to the best effort culture 4

1.1.6. The new services of the new networks 5

1.2. Mobile communications customers 5

1.2.1. Mobile service user: a communicating customer 5

1.2.2. The successful teachings of mobile telephony and the Internet for the new generation services 6

1.2.3. The communicating customer and his values 7

1.2.3.1. Compatibility with the present and its practices 7

1.2.3.2. Membership and availability 7

1.2.3.3. Cost optimization 8

1.2.3.4. Security 8

1.2.4. Mobility based acceleration 8

1.2.4.1. Terminal size and its interaction modes 8

1.2.4.2. Multi-network environment 9

1.2.4.3. Service heterogenity 10

1.2.5. Adaptability as a mobility value 10

1.3. Technological and adaptability factors of mobile services 11

1.3.1. A microcomputer inside each pocket 11

1.3.2. An Internet or a juxtaposition of intranets? 12

1.3.3. On the convergence of universal sets or how to contact a person 14

1.3.4. Proximity as a way to address the mobile services 15

1.3.5. The jungle of networks or how can we communicate in a hostile environment? 16

1.3.6. How can we carry our home in our pocket? 17

1.4. Conclusion: “I am a nomad in at least five different ways” 18

1.4.1. A new challenge: reconciling the incompatible 18

1.4.2. A combination of new technologies and new economic models 18

Chapter 2. Object Modeling and Software-defined Radio 21
Antoine DELAUTRE and Yann DENEF

2.1. Introduction 21

2.1.1. History of the software industry 22

2.1.2. Object modeling 24

2.1.3. Modeling and data flow 25

2.1.4. Constituent model 27

2.1.5. Software bus 27

2.1.6. Product line 31

2.2. Applicability of the component-based approach to the field of software-defined radio 33

2.2.1. Software-defined radio 33

2.2.2. Evolution of the industrial tissue 35

2.2.3. Need for stable interfaces 37

2.3. The constraints of the component-based approach 38

2.3.1. Execution time constraints 38

2.3.2. Software – hardware coupling constraints 38

2.3.3. Reminder on the evolution of software technologies 39

2.3.4. Regulatory constraints 40

2.3.5. Deployment constraints 41

2.4. An outline of the works pertaining to the component-based approach for software-defined radio 42

2.4.1. SPEAKeasy and JTRS 42

2.4.2. The weight of the USA 42

2.4.3. The impact of JTRS on industrial sector technologies 43

2.4.4. Communication software architecture 44

2.4.5. Hardware architecture 46

2.4.6. Standardizing activities 46

2.4.7. UML profile for software-defined radio 48

2.4.7.1. Resources metamodel for software-defined radio 48

2.4.7.2. Model of peripheral component 49

2.4.7.3. Communication channel 50

2.4.8. Scope of the UML model 51

2.4.9. The OMPT approach 52

2.5. Conclusion 52

Chapter 3. Trade-offs for Building a Reconfigurable Radio Terminal 55
Marylin ARNDT, Eric BATUT, Jean-Philippe FASSINO, Florence GERMAIN, Tahar JARBOUI, Marc LACOSTE, Christian LEREAU, François MARX, Benoît MISCOPEIN and Jacques PULOU

3.1. Introduction 55

3.2. Architectures and reconfiguration mechanisms 57

3.2.1. From scenario to architecture 57

3.2.1.1. Recall of needs 57

3.2.1.2. General principles of reconfiguration 58

3.2.2. Architecture and mechanisms for hardware reconfiguration 60

3.2.2.1. Functional architecture of a mobile terminal 60

3.2.2.2. Reconfiguration of RF front-end, an outline on the new technological challenges and the candidate architectures 61

3.2.2.3. Digital reconfigurable architecture 65

3.2.2.4. Comparison 67

3.2.3. Mechanisms for software reconfiguration 67

3.2.3.1. A first stage toward reconfiguration: assembly designing of extensible systems 68

3.2.3.2. A second stage toward reconfiguration: the compositional approach 69

3.3. Compromise for the hardware reconfiguration 70

3.3.1. Baseband: to benefit from the reconfigurability in order to limit consumption 70

3.3.1.1. Equalizer 71

3.3.1.2. Channel coding 74

3.3.1.3. Conclusion 77

3.3.2. Mechanisms of reconfiguration and control: flexibility versus genericity 77

3.3.2.1. Is the absolute separation data/control always accepted? 77

3.3.2.2. Is a fixed functional clipping of the processing still relevant? 79

3.3.2.3. Which degree of exposure of the hardware to the reconfiguration mechanism? 81

3.4. Compromise for software reconfiguration 82

3.4.1. Reconfigurability and compactness of transmitted information 82

3.4.2. Reconfigurability and safety 83

3.4.2.1. Type of kernel 84

3.4.2.2. Security model 86

3.4.2.3. Localization of the protection mechanism 87

3.4.2.4. Degree of assurance 88

3.4.2.5. Perspectives 88

3.4.3. Reconfigurability and performances 88

3.4.3.1. Introduction 88

3.4.3.2. Reconfiguration impact on nominal mode performances for a hierarchical “component-based” system 89

3.5. Some open problems 91

3.5.1. The problem of reversibility 91

3.5.2. The problem of continuity of service 92

3.6. Conclusion 93

3.7. Bibliography 93

Chapter 4. A UMTS-TDD Software Radio Platform 97
Christian BONNET, Hervé CALLEWAERT, Lionel GAUTHIER, Raymond KNOPP, Pascal MAYANI, Aawatif MENOUNI HAYAR, Dominique NUSSBAUM and Michelle WETTERWALD

4.1. Introduction 97

4.2. Hardware architecture 99

4.2.1. Radio gateways 99

4.2.2. Terminal equipment 102

4.2.3. RF emulation 103

4.3. Software architecture 104

4.3.1. RTLinux 104

4.3.2. Programming modes of the processor 105

4.3.3. RF simulation software 105

4.4. Connection to the IPv6 network 106

4.4.1. “Pure-IPv6” architecture 106

4.4.2. Radio protocols 107

4.4.3. Interconnection layers 109

4.4.4. Management of the radio resources 110

4.5. Reconfigurability 111

4.5.1. Functional reconfigurability 111

4.5.2. Operational reconfigurability 111

4.5.3. Software reconfigurability 113

4.6. Conclusion 113

4.7. Bibliography 114

Chapter 5. Iterative Approach for Hardware Reconfigurability: The Rake Receiver 115
Ioannis KRIKIDIS, Lírida NAVINER and Jean-Luc DANGER

5.1. Introduction 115

5.2. Concept of hardware reconfigurability 117

5.2.1. The “multiplexing” approach 118

5.2.2. The “pagination” approach 118

5.2.3. The “factorization” approach 118

5.2.4. The “iteration” approach 119

5.3. Example 1: reconfigurable rake receiver with an “interference canceller” 120

5.3.1. Formulation of the problem 120

5.3.2. Proposed algorithm 122

5.3.3. Evaluation of performance 124

5.3.4. Reconfigurable architecture 125

5.3.4.1. The data memory 127

5.3.4.2. The arithmetic unit 127

5.3.4.3. The configuration supervisor 130

5.4. Example 2: an interference canceller based on realistic channel estimation 131

5.4.1. Formulation of the problem 131

5.4.2. Proposed algorithm 133

5.4.3. Evaluation of the performance 135

5.4.4. Reconfigurable architecture 137

5.5. Conclusion 140

5.6. Bibliography 141

Chapter 6. Antenna Arrays and Reconfigurable MIMO Systems 143
Sébastien ROY and Jean-Yves CHOUINARD

6.1. Introduction 143

6.2. Large broadband transmission and reconfigurable transceivers 144

6.2.1. General context 144

6.2.1.1. Quality of service 145

6.2.1.2. Interoperability 145

6.2.1.3. Propagation conditions 146

6.2.2. Reconfigurable radios 147

6.3. Space-time processing and MIMO systems 150

6.3.1. Modeling of the wireless channel 151

6.3.2. Space-time processing 151

6.3.3. Multiple reconfigurable antenna systems 155

6.3.4. MIMO systems and matrix channels 157

6.3.5. Capacity of antenna arrays 159

6.3.6. Space-time codes 160

6.4. Existing architectures 163

6.4.1. Frequency diversity and space-time encoding: MIMO-OFDM 163

6.4.2. Spatial multiplexing: BLAST systems 164

6.4.3. Turbo-BLAST systems 166

6.5. Reconfigurable MIMO systems 166

6.6. Case study 167

6.6.1. WCDMA MIMO receiver 167

6.6.2. Receiver architectures for adaptive antenna arrays 170

6.7. Conclusion 172

6.8. Bibliography 173

Chapter 7. Analog-to-Digital Conversion for Software Radio 175
Patrick LOUMEAU, Lírida NAVINER and Jean-François NAVINER

7.1. Introduction 175

7.2. Current ADC performances 176

7.3. Architecture of receivers 177

7.3.1. Sampling in intermediate frequency 178

7.3.2. Zero IF or low IF receiver 180

7.4. ADC architectures 181

7.4.1. Analog-to-digital pipeline converter 182

7.4.1.1. Principle of pipeline conversion 182

7.4.1.2. Errors of pipeline converters 183

7.4.1.3. Redundancy and digital correction 183

7.4.2. Analog-to-digital converter with sigma delta modulation 186

7.4.2.1. Introduction 186

7.4.2.2. Sigma delta modulation and oversampling 186

7.4.2.3. Limitations 187

7.4.2.4. Architectures 188

7.4.3. Analog-to-digital converters and reconfigurability 189

7.4.4. Digital front-end: filtering for ?Ã?´?nconversion and channel selection 190

7.5. ADC evolution 194

7.6. Conclusion 195

7.7. Bibliography 196

Chapter 8. Flexible Spectrum Management 199
David GRANDBLAISE

8.1. Introduction 199

8.2. Flexible spectrum management drivers 200

8.2.1. The spectrum is not rare, it is used inappropriately 200

8.2.2. Spectrum reuse, connection opportunities and reconfigurable radio equipment 201

8.2.3. Sporadic use of spectrum in time and space 203

8.2.4. The opportunities for flexible spectrum management 205

8.2.5. Resource sharing and economic impact 207

8.3. Flexible spectrum management models 210

8.3.1. Command and control model 211

8.3.2. Common model 211

8.3.3. Market model 212

8.3.4. Unrestricted usage model 213

8.3.5. Comparison of the models 213

8.3.6. Degrees of freedom and complexity 215

8.4. The technologies 217

8.4.1. Interference temperature 217

8.4.2. Forms of heteromorphic waves 220

8.4.3. Cognitive radio 222

8.4.4. Cognitive radio etiquette 226

8.5. Conclusion 228

8.6. Bibliography 229

List of Authors 233

Index 237