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Rethinking Literacy Education: The Critical Need for Practice-Based Change

Rethinking Literacy Education: The Critical Need for Practice-Based Change

B. Allan Quigley

ISBN: 978-0-787-90287-2

Oct 1996, Jossey-Bass

304 pages

Select type: Hardcover

In Stock

$48.00

Description

1998 Winner of the Cyril O. Houle World Award for Literature in Adult EducationIn this thought-provoking book, Quigley offers a new view of illiteracy that starts with the learner and takes into account a broad array of work, family, and cultural considerations. This guide gives adult educators and trainers working in the field concrete suggestions and alternatives for their work that they can use to shape a new philosophy of adult literacy and improve their practice.
ILLITERACY THROUGH SOCIETY'S EYES.

1. Myths, Rhetoric, and Stereotypes About Literacy.

2. The Popular Perspective and the Media.

3. The Political Perspective and Literacy Programs.

HOW TEACHERS AND ADMINISTRATORS VIEW ILLITERACY.

4. Rethinking Educational Approaches.

5. What Textbooks Can Communicate to Learners.

ENGAGING NONPARTICIPANTS AND DROPOUTS.

6. Understanding Attrition and Improving Retention.

7. Why Many Resist, and Ways to Recruit Them.

8. Grounding Programs and Policies in Practical Knowledge.

9. Literacy Educators as Leaders of Effective Change.

TAKING ACTION TO TRANSFORM LITERACY EDUCATION.
?This book is challenging, useful, insightful, authoritative, and hopeful--one that every adult literacy education policy and program leader, researcher and practitioner should read. With this work, Allan Quigley has made a first-rate contribution to our field.? (Jean H. Lowe, director, GED Testing Service)

?Quigley's perspective on adult literacy is fresh and provocative. Rethinking Literacy Education impels adult literacy professionals to reconsider what they are doing and why.? (Hal Beder, professor, department of educational theory, policy, and administration, Rutgers)

?Valuable in encouraging literacy practitioners to be more proactive in challenging misguided public policy and damaging literacy rhetoric.? (Elisabeth Hayes, associate professor, department of continuing and vocational education, University of Wisconsin-Madison)