Skip to main content

Scale Issues in Hydrological Modelling

Scale Issues in Hydrological Modelling

J. D. Kalma (Editor), M. Sivapalan (Editor)

ISBN: 978-0-471-95847-5

Sep 1995

504 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$460.00

Description

There is a growing need for appropriate models which address the management of land and water resources and ecosystems at large space and time scales. Theories of non-linear hydrological processes must be extrapolated to large-scale, three-dimensional natural systems such as drainage basins, flood plains and wetlands. This book reports on recent progress in research on scale issues in hydrological modelling. It brings together 27 papers from two special issues of the journal Hydrological Processes. The book makes a significant contribution towards developing research strategies for linking model parameterisations across a range of temporal and spatial scales. The papers selected for this book reflect the tremendous advances which have been made in research into scale issues in hydrological modelling during the last ten years.

Buy Both and Save 25%!

This item: Scale Issues in Hydrological Modelling

Contemporary Hydrology: Towards Holistic Environmental Science (Hardcover $328.95)

Original Price:$788.95

Purchased together:$591.71

save $197.24

Cannot be combined with any other offers.

Partial table of contents:

Investigating the Representative Elementary Area Concept: An Approach Based on Field Data (R. Woods, et al.).

Physical Interpretations of Regional Variations in the Scaling Exponents of Flood Quantiles (V. Gupta & D. Dawdy).

A Process-Based Model for Colluvial Soil Depth and Shallow Landsliding Using Digital Elevation Data (W. Dietrich, et al.).

Predicting Catchment-Scale Soil Moisture Status with Limited Field Measurements (J. Kalma, et al.).

Estimation of Land Surface Parameters Using Satellite Data (H. Xinmei, et al.).

Global Atmospheric Water Balance and Runoff from Large River Basins (T. Oki, et al.).

Simulating Heterogeneous Vegetation in Climate Models: Identifying When Secondary Vegetation Becomes Important (A. Pitman).

Index.