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Scale and Geographic Inquiry: Nature, Society, and Method

Scale and Geographic Inquiry: Nature, Society, and Method

Eric Sheppard (Editor), Robert B. McMaster (Editor)

ISBN: 978-0-470-99914-1

Jan 2008, Wiley-Blackwell

288 pages

Description

This book is the first contemporary book to compare and integrate the various ways geographers think about and use scale across the spectrum of the discipline and includes state-of-the-art contributions by authoritative human geographers, physical geographers and GIS specialists.

  • Provides a state of the art survey of how geographers think about scale.
  • Brings together recent interest in scale in human and physical geography, as well as geographic information science
  • Places competing concepts of scale side by side in order to compare them.
  • The introduction and conclusion, by the editors, explores the common ground.
List of Figures.

List of Tables.

List of Contributors.

Preface.

Introduction: Scale And Geographic Inquiry: Robert B. Mcmaster And Eric Sheppard (University Of Minnesota, University Of Minnesota).

1. Fractals And Scale In Environmental Assessment And Monitoring: Nina Siu-Ngan Lam (Louisiana State University).

2. Population And Environment Interactions: Spatial Considerations In Landscape Characterization And Modeling: Stephen J. Walsh, Kelley A. Crews-Meyer, Thomas W. Crawford, William F. Welsh (University Of North Carolina, University Of Texas, Gettysburg College, University Of North Carolina).

3 Crossing The Divide: Linking Global And Local Scales In Human-Environment Systems: William E. Easterling And Colin Polsky (Penn State University, Harvard University).

4. Independence, Contingency, And Scale Linkage In Physical Geography: Jonathan D. Phillips (University Of Kentucky).

5. Embedded Scales In Biogeography: Susy S. Ziegler, Gary M. Pereira, Dwight A. Brown (All At University Of Minnesota).

6. Scaled Geographies: Nature, Place, And The Contested Politics Of Scale: Erik Swyndegouw (University Of Oxford).

7. Scales Of Cybergeography: Michael F. Goodchild (University Of California).

8. A Long Way From Home: Domesticating The Social Production Of Scale: Sallie Marston (University Of Arizona).

9. Scale Bending And The Fate Of The National: Neil Smith (City University Of New York).

10. Is There A Europe Of Cities? Peter Taylor (Loughborough University).

11. The Politics Of Scale And Networks Of Spatial Connectivity: Transnational Interurban Networks And Rescaling Of Political Governance In Europe: Helga Leitner (University Of Minnesota).

12. Scale And Geographic Inquiry: Contrasts, Intersections, And Boundaries: Robert B. Mcmaster And Eric Sheppard (University Of Minnesota, University Of Minnesota).

Index.

"…engages incisively with what consideration of scale can offer to a wide range of crucial social, physical, and cartographic issues – from environmental monitoring to urban development – and provides an essential starting point in terms of the uses and meanings of the concept." John Agnew, University of California Los Angeles


"This volume is both timely and welcome. As society faces a new world order that reflects the increasing tension and simultaneity between local and global forces, it is essential to lay the foundations toward a comprehensive ‘theory of scale’. This volume, through its integration and contemplation of disparate ideas drawn from the spectrum of geographical perspectives, is a crucial first step toward that grand agenda." Bernie Bauer, University of Southern California

"This is a fascinating book...it covers an intimidating array of subjects but shows how one aspect - scale - can affect all of them in surprisingly similar ways. The depth and breadth of coverage makes the text an invaluable one." Dr Paul Ganderton, Teaching Ecology News.

"This book is important reading for all geographers based on its catholic content and because it provides a lens into our diverse discipline. Few edited collections contain such consistently strong chapters. Scale and Geographic Enquiry is recommended for all geographers, especially graduate students and their instructors." The Geographical Journal


  • Provides a state of the art survey of how geographers think about scale.
  • Brings together recent interest in scale in human and physical geography, as well as geographic information science.
  • Places competing concepts of scale side by side in order to compare them.
  • The introduction and conclusion, by the editors, explores the common ground.