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Social Justice

Social Justice

Matthew Clayton (Editor), Andrew Williams (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-11109-6

Feb 2004

336 pages

Out of stock

$157.95

Description

This reader brings together classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice.

  • A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice.
  • Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume.
  • Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin.
  • Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations.
  • Philosophically challenging yet accessible to students.
Acknowledgements.

Introduction.

Part I: Historical Essays:.

1. Of Property: John Locke.

2. Of Justice: David Hume.

Part II: Contemporary Theories:.

3. On Justice as Fairness: John Rawls.

4. An Entitlement Theory: Robert Nozick.

5. Equality of Resources: Ronald Dworkin (NYU).

6. Against Equality of Resources: Relocating Dworkin’s Cut: G. A. Cohen (All Souls, Oxford.

7. Against Luck Egalitarianism: What is the Point of Equality? Elizabeth S. Anderson (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor).

8. The Concept of Desert: David Miller.

Part III: Issues:.

9. The Family: Gender and Justice: Susan Moller Okin.

10. The Market: On the Site of Distributive Justice: G. A. Cohen.

11. Justice across Cultures: Is Multiculturalism Bad for Animals? Paula Casal.

12. Justice across Borders: Brief for a Global Resources Dividend: Thomas W. Pogge (University of Colombia).

13. Justice across Generations: The Non-Identity Problem: Derek Parfit (All Souls, Oxford).

Index

"This is an essential collection for students interested in the meaning and politics of social justice." Debra Satz, Stanford University <!--end-->


"This volume is a wonderful introduction to the main contemporary debates about distributive justice. . . the editors provide a sure guide for students through this fascinating landscape of ideas." Thomas Christiano, University of Arizona


"This collection is clear in conception, carefully edited, and sharply introduced. Could a course on social justice reasonably ask for anything more?" Mark Philp, University of Oxford


  • A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice.

  • Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume.

  • Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin.

  • Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations.

  • Philosophically challenging yet accessible to students.