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Sociological Methodology, Volume 33, 2003

Sociological Methodology, Volume 33, 2003

Ross M. Stolzenberg (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-11671-8

Dec 2003, Wiley-Blackwell

400 pages

Select type: Hardcover

$211.95

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Description

Measurement and analysis are the key analytic tasks in empirical sociological research. Sociological Methodology Volume 33 includes a wide range of fresh solutions to old and new measurement and analysis problems, including the “reference category problem,” the problems involved in measuring and analyzing time data in various research contexts, and problems that arise when measuring and analyzing the results of network analysis.

  • Introduces innovative solutions to both new and old problems with the key analytic tasks in empirical sociological research--measurement an analysis.
  • Provides important contributions to a wide range of sociological research methods.
Part I: New Solutions for Old Problems:.

1. Overcoming the Reference Category Problem in the Presentation of Statistical Models: David Firth (Oxford University).

Part II: Time Measurement and Analysis:.

2. An Assessment of Alternative Measures of Time Use: F. Thomas Juster, Hiromi Ono, and Frank P. Stafford (University of Michigan, all).

3. Measuring the Frequency of Regular Behaviors: Comparing the "Typical Week" to the "Past Week": LinChiat Chang and Jon A. Krosnick (Ohio State University, all).

4. Accelerated Failure-Time Mover-Stayer Regression Models for the Analysis of Last-Episode Data: Kazuo Yamaguchi (University of Chicago).

5. Modeling Multiple Failure Time Data: A Survey of Variance-Corrected Proportional Hazards Models with Empirical Applications to Arrest Data: Michael E. Ezell, Kenneth C. Land, and Lawrence E. Cohen (Vanderbilt University, Duke University, and University of California at Davis).

Part III: Measurement and Analysis in the Structural Equations Framework:.

6. A Multivariate, Multilevel Rasch Model with Application to Self-Reported Criminal Behavior: Stephen W. Raudenbush, Christopher Johnson, and Robert J. Sampson (University of Michigan, University of Michigan, and Harvard University).

7. Multilevel Latent Class Models: Jeroen K. Vermunt (Tilburg University).

8. Assessing the Effect of Model Misspecifications on Parameter Estimates in Structural Equation Models: Ke-Hai Yuan, Linda L. Marshall, and Peter M. Bentler (University of Notre Dame, University of North Texas, and UCLA).

9. Model Fit in Structural Equation Models with Censored, Ordina, nad Dichotomous Variables: Testing Vanishing Tetrads: John R. Hipp and Kenneth A. Bollen (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, all).

Part IV: Measurement and Analysis of Social Networks:.

10. Settings in Social Networks: A Measurement Model: Michael Schweinberger and Tom A.B. Snijders (Interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology and University of Groningen).

11. A Liang-Zeger Method for Modeling Dyadic Interdependence in the Analysis of Social Networks: Kazou Yamaguchi (University of Chicago).

Part V: Unfinished Business.

Rejoinder: Ted Palys and John Lowman (Simon Frasier University, all)


  • Introduces innovative solutions to both new and old problems with the key analytic tasks in empirical sociological research--measurement an analysis.
  • Provides important contributions to a wide range of sociological research methods.