Skip to main content

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

Standard Electroencephalography in Clinical Psychiatry: A Practical Handbook

Nash N. Boutros, Silvana Galderisi, Oliver Pogarell, Silvana Riggio

ISBN: 978-0-470-74782-7

Apr 2011

198 pages

In Stock

$69.95

Description

This book provides a concise overview of the possible clinical applications of standard EEG in clinical psychiatry. After a short history, the book describes the physiologic basis of the EEG signal, then reviews the principles of EEG in terms of technical backgrounds and requirements, EEG recording and signal analysis, with plentiful illustrations of the most frequent biological or technical artefacts. Normal EEG patterns and waveforms for easy reference are clearly presented, before the detailed description of abnormal patterns.

With the basic information in hand, the reader progresses to an account of the role of EEG in the diagnostic work up in psychiatry, covering nonconvulsive status epilepticus, frontal lobe seizures and non-epileptic seizures. The clinical application of EEG in both childhood and adult disorders follows, including many case vignettes. The effects of psychotropic drugs on EEG are highlighted.

The book closes with a discussion of currently available certification venues for Clinical Neurophysiology along with limitations of each venue. It calls for the development of training guidelines and certification processes specific to Psychiatric Electrophysiology.

The material is clearly presented throughout, with plenty of figures, tables with summaries of relevant findings, flow diagrams for diagnostic work-up, boxes with learning points, and short lists of key references.

We fully expect the book will become the standard teaching source for psychiatry residents and fellows, as well as a useful resource for practising psychiatrists and clinical psychologists.

Praise for the book:

""This distinguished group of editors has put together chapters that represent an excellent practical handbook on electroencephalography in clinical psychiatry, now a very important topic. I highly recommend it not only to psychiatrists, but also to anyone interested in neuroscience.""
John R. Hughes, DM (Oxon), MD, PhD, Professor of Neurology, University of Illinois Medical Center, at Chicago, Illinois, USA

List of Contributors.

Preface.

1 Historical Review of Electroencephalography in Psychiatry (Nash Boutros).

Introduction.

The early pre-clinical era.

Early history of human electroencephalography.

Electroencephalography in psychiatry today.

References.

2 Physiologic Basis of the EEG Signal (Paola Bucci and Silvana Galderisi).

Membrane potentials.

Excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials.

Nonsynaptic intercellular events contributing to the EEG signal.

Factors determining polarity and other characteristics of the surface EEG waveforms.

Brain structures involved in the genesis of EEG rhythms.

References.

3 EEG Recording and Analysis (Oliver Pogarell).

Techniques and technical background.

References.

4 Normal EEG Patterns and Waveforms (Paola Bucci, Armida Mucci and Silvana Galderisi).

Introduction.

Normal EEG patterns in the waking adult.

References.

5 Abnormal Patterns (Oliver Pogarell).

Introduction.

Detection of artefacts.

Abnormal patterns.

Focal alterations.

References.

6 The Role of EEG in the Diagnostic Work Up in Psychiatry: Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus, Frontal Lobe Seizures, Non-Epileptic Seizures (Silvana Riggio).

Nonconvulsive status.

Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

Frontal lobe seizures.

References.

7 EEG in Childhood Psychiatric Disorders (Mary W. Roberts and Nash Boutros).

Introduction.

Attention deficit disorder.

Autistic spectrum disorders.

References.

8 EEG in Psychoses, Mood Disorders and Catatonia (Nash Boutros, Silvana Galderisi, Oliver Pogarell and Felix Segmiller).

Introduction.

EEG in psychoses.

EEG in mood disorders.

EEG findings in catatonia.

References.

9 Standard EEG in Personality and Anxiety Disorders (Nash Boutros).

Introduction.

EEG in aggression and impulse dyscontrol.

Panic attacks.

Borderline personality disorder.

References.

10 EEG in Delirium and Dementia (Sophia Wang and Silvana Riggio).

Introduction: Epidemiology of delirium and dementia.

Clinical diagnosis in delirium.

EEG work up in delirium.

Metabolic causes of delirium.

Infectious causes of delirium.

Clinical diagnosis and EEG work up in dementia.

Conclusion.

References.

11 Effects of Psychotropic Drugs on EEG (Silvana Galderisi and Armida Mucci).

Introduction.

The role of EEG assessment of drug-induced CNS toxicity in psychiatric patients.

Antipsychotic drugs.

Lithium.

Other mood stabilisers.

Anxiolytics.

Antidepressants.

Recreational drugs.

Case vignette.

References.

12 Certification and Training in EEG and Clinical Neurophysiology (Nash Boutros and Silvana Galderisi).

Clinical neurophysiology board certification.

Index.

""This handbook, written and edited by experts in the field, is a welcome addition to the psychiatric literature. The only comparable book on this topic is EEG and Evoked Potentials in Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurology, Hughes and Wilson (Butterworth-Heinemann, 1983). This handbook is sort of an update of that classic."" (Doody's, 7 October 2011)

""Whether such a curriculum is defined in your country or not the book is recommended to all psychiatrists and clinical psychologists working with diagnosis of patients. For psychiatric residents it is an easily accessible, handy yet sufficiently exhaustive introduction to EEG."" (Acta Neuropsychiatrica, 2011)

""In summary, this book will most certainly be included in psychiatry curricula and will be a milestone of which Hans Berger will be proud."" (Epilepsy & Behavior, 7 May 2011)

""The guide is readable and is useful for medical students, psychiatric residents and clinicians seeking to augment their clinical skills in managing complex psychiatric treatments. The book fills a need and is a reminder that brain physiology is the core component in understanding and treating the aberrant behaviors that fill psychiatric clinics."" (Acta, 1 May 2011)