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The Bioethics Reader: Editors' Choice

The Bioethics Reader: Editors' Choice

Ruth Chadwick (Editor), Helga Kuhse (Editor), Willem A. Landman (Editor), Udo Schüklenk (Editor), Peter Singer (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-17522-7

Sep 2007, Wiley-Blackwell

620 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$41.95

Description

A collection celebrating some of the best essays from the Blackwell journals, Bioethics and Developing World Bioethics.
  • Contributors include Helga Kuhse, Michael Selgelid and Baroness Mary Warnock, former Chair of the British Government’s Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilization and Embryology’s.
  • Traces some of the most important concerns of the 1980s, such as the ethics of euthanasia, reproductive technologies, the allocation of scarce medical resources, surrogate motherhood, through to a range of new issues debated today, particularly in the field of genetics.
  • Includes contributions that are still as hotly debated today as they were 20 years ago and serves as a salutary reminder that free and open discussion is vital to the health of the discipline itself.
  • Includes eight sections comprising some of the journals' best publications in methodological issues, the health care professional-patient relationship, public health ethics, research ethics, genetics, as well as beginning- and end-of-life issues.
  • Will serve the academic bioethicists as well as students of bioethics as an excellent source book.
Introduction: Ruth Chadwick, Helga Kuhse, Willem Landman, Udo Schüklenk, and Peter Singer.

Part I: Doing Bioethics:.

1. A Report from America: When Philosophers Shoot from the Hip: James Rachels.

2. Rethinking Medical Ethics: A View from Below: Paul Farmer and Nicole Gastineau Campos.

3. What Can the Social Sciences Contribute to the Study of Ethics? Theoretical, Empirical and Substantive Considerations: Erica Hajmes.

4. In Defense of Posthuman Dignity: Nick Bostrom.

Part II: Healthcare Professional–Patient Relationship:.

5. Patients’ Responsibilities in Medical Ethics: Heather Draper and Tom Sorell.

6. Clinical Ethics and Nursing: ‘Yes’ to Caring, But ‘No’ to a Female Ethics of Care: Helga Kuhse.

7. Background Briefing Psychiatric Ethics: Jennifer Radden.

8. Female Genital Mutilation and Cosmetic Surgery: Regulating Non-Therapeutic Body Modification: Sally Sheldon and Stephen Wilkinson.

Part III: Just Health Care:.

9. Patents and Access to Drugs in Developing Countries: An Ethical Analysis: Sigrid Sterckx.

10. Justice and Equal Opportunities in Health Care: John Harris.

11. Constraints and Heroes: Carl Elliott.

Part IV: Public Health Ethics:.

12. The Genesis of Public Health Ethics: Ronald Bayer and Amy L. Fairchild.

13. Ethics and Infectious Disease: Michael J. Selgelid.

14. Vaccination and the Prevention Problem: Angus Dawson.

Part V: Research Ethics:.

15. Background Briefing: International Research Ethics: Udo Schüklenk and Richard Ashcroft.

16. Equipoise and International Human-Subjects Research: Alex John London.

17. Symposium: Drugs for the Developing World,.

Developing Drugs for the Developing World: An Economic, Legal, Moral, and Political Dilemma: David B. Resnik.

18. Some Questions about the Moral Responsibilities of Drug Companies in Developing Countries: Dan W. Brock.

19. Social Responsibility and Global Pharmaceutical Companies: Norman Daniels.

Part VI: Genetics:.

20. Do Human Cells Have Rights?: Mary Warnock.

21. Going to the Roots of the Stem Cell Controversy: Søren Holm.

22. Designing Babies: Morally Permissible Ways to Modify the Human Genome: Nicholas Agar.

23. The Non-Identity Problem and Genetic Harms – the Case of Wrongful Handicaps: Dan W. Brock.

24. Coding and Consent: Moral Challenges of the Database Project in Iceland: Vilhjálmur Árnason.

Part VII: Beginning of Life Issues:.

25. Is It Good to Make Happy People?: Stuart Rachels.

26. Genes, Embryos, and Future People: Walter Glannon.

27. Procreative Beneficence: Why We Should Select the Best Children: Julian Savulescu.

28. The Problem of Abortion: Essentially Contested Concepts and Moral Autonomy: Susanne Gibson.

29. Law and Bioethics, The Injustice of Unsafe Motherhood: Rebecca J. Cook and Bernard M. Dickens.

30. The Limits of Conscientious Objection to Abortion in the Developing World: Louis-Jacques van Bogaert.

31. Surrogate Mothering: Exploitation or Empowerment?: Laura M. Purdy.

Part VIII: End of Life:.

32. The Metaphysics of Brain Death: Jeff McMahan.

33. Advance Directives, Autonomy and Unintended Death: Jim Stone.

34. End of Life Care in HIV-Infected Children Who Died in Hospital: Lesley D. Henley.

Index

‘A nice synthesis of some developments in the field that will be useful to those who dabble in bioethics, or who are interested in seeing what new areas of research have emerged alongside new technological advances and growing globalization. It is a nice supplement to some of the more traditional collections of contributions to this growing field.’
J. Jeremy Wisnewski, PhD, Hartwick College
From Metapsychology Online Reviews (Volume 12, Issue 7)
For the full review please visit: http://metapsychology.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=book&id=4071

  • A collection celebrating some of the best essays from the Blackwell journals, Bioethics and Developing World Bioethics
  • Contributors include Helga Kuhse, Michael Selgelid and Baroness Mary Warnock, former Chair of the British Government’s Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilization and Embryology
  • Traces some of the most important concerns of the 1980s, such as the ethics of euthanasia, reproductive technologies, the allocation of scarce medical resources, surrogate motherhood, through to a range of new issues debated today, particularly in the field of genetics
  • Includes contributions that are still as hotly debated today as they were 20 years ago