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The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Language

The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Language

Michael Devitt (Editor), Richard Hanley (Editor)

ISBN: 978-0-631-23142-4

Apr 2006

456 pages

In Stock

$57.95

Description

The Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Language is a collection of twenty new essays in a cutting-edge and wide-ranging field.
  • Surveys central issues in contemporary philosophy of language while examining foundational topics
  • Provides pedagogical tools such as abstracts and suggestions for further readings
  • Topics addressed include the nature of meaning, speech acts and pragmatics, figurative language, and naturalistic theories of reference
Preface.

Notes on Contributors.

Introduction: Michael Devitt and Richard Hanley.

Part I: Foundational Issues.

Foundations issues in the philosophy of language: Martin Davies (Australian National University).

Part II: Meaning.

The nature of meaning: Paul Horwich (City University of New York Graduate Center).

Truth and reference as the basis for meaning: James Higginbotham (University of Southern California).

Language, thought, and meaning: Brian Loar (Rutgers University).

Meaning skepticism: Alex Miller (Macquarie University).

Analyticity again: Jerry Fodor and Ernie Lepore (Rutgers University).

Formal semantics: Max Cresswell (University of Aukland & Texas A&M University) Speech acts and pragmatics: Kent Bach (San Francisco State University).

Figurative language: Josef Stern (University of Chicago & Bar-Ilan University, Israel).

Propositional attitude ascription: Mark Richard (Tufts University).

Conditionals: Frank Jackson (Australian National University).

Vagueness: Stephen Schiffer (New York University).

The semantics of non-factualism, non-cognitivism, quasi-realism: Simon Blackburn (University of Cambridge).

Part III: Reference.

Names: William Lycan (University of North Carolina).

General terms and mass terms: Stephen Schwartz (Ithaca College).

Descriptions: Peter Ludlow and Stephen Neale (University of Michigan & Rutgers University).

Using indexicals: John Perry (Stanford University).

Pronouns and anaphora: Stephen Neale (Rutgers University).

Naturalistic theories of reference: Karen Neander (University of California, Davis) Truth: Vann McGee (Massachusetts Institute of Technology).

Bibliography.

Index.

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“Contains much of worth and will not doubt prove a useful addition to the burgeoning market for survey volumes in philosophy of language.” (Philosophy In Review)

  • Twenty new essays written by internationally renowned scholars

  • Surveys central issues in contemporary philosophy of language while examining foundational topics

  • Provides pedagogical tools such as abstracts and suggestions for further readings

  • Topics addressed include the nature of meaning, speech acts and pragmatics, figurative language, and naturalistic theories of reference