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The Ends of Philosophy: Pragmatism, Foundationalism and Postmodernism

The Ends of Philosophy: Pragmatism, Foundationalism and Postmodernism

Lawrence E. Cahoone

ISBN: 978-0-631-23405-0

Apr 2002, Wiley-Blackwell

436 pages

Select type: Paperback

In Stock

$51.95

Description

This book engages the confrontation between the foundationalist aims of traditional philosophy, the postmodern critique, and the pragmatic attempt to maintain a form of non-foundational inquiry. Through readings of the work of Peirde, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Buchler, Derrida, Rorty, and others, the author examines the nature and scope of philosophically relevant knowledge.

  • Ambitious and important work, by a respected philosopher.
  • Presents a clear and thoughtful analysis of key philosophical traditions.
  • Examines the nature and scope of philosophically relevant knowledge.
Preface.

Abbreviations.

Introduction.

1. The Question of Philosophy.

2. Realism and Philosophical Knowledge.

3. Peirce's (Anti) Realism.

4. Nonfoundational Realism.

5. Nietzsche's Naturalistic Epistemology.

6. Wittgenstein's Social Relativism.

7. Buchler's Objective Relativism.

8. Derrida's Semiotic Relativism.

9. Rorty's Antiphilosophical Pragmatism.

10. The Ends of Philosophy.

Conclusion.

Notes.

Bibliography.

Index.


"The Ends of Philosophy has an ambitious project, an engaging philosophical seriousness, wonderful metaphilosophical remarks, and terrific historical chapters. The chapter on Peirce's philosophy is, perhaps, the very best discussion I have seen. This is not to say I agreed with all of it – I did not agree with the criticism of me! – but I was impressed by all of it, including the unexpectedly poignant and modest conclusion." Hilary Putnam, Harvard University <!--end-->

"Cahoone is acutely aware of the problem of self-referentiality in philosophy. The problem especially plagues relativism because, if truth is relative to an inquirer or to a context, then so is the claim that this is so. Cahoone shows that all forms of anti-realism must affirm some form of relativism, even naturalism and pragmatism. This argument is often put forward more for its display of logical acumen than as a serious way to probe the strengths and limitations of a position. Cahoone has the latter purpose. He develops his arguments judiciously, and is so successful in making his point that he can turn this critique upon himself with a positive result. This is one of the notable accomplishments of the book." George Allan, Dickinson College


  • Ambitious and important work, by a respected philosopher.
  • Presents a clear and thoughtful analysis of key philosophical traditions.
  • Examines the nature and scope of philosophically relevant knowledge.