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The Everyday Language of White Racism

The Everyday Language of White Racism

Jane H. Hill

ISBN: 978-1-405-18454-0

Nov 2008, Wiley-Blackwell

240 pages

In Stock

$121.95

Description

In The Everyday Language of White Racism, Jane H. Hill provides an incisive analysis of everyday language to reveal the underlying racist stereotypes that continue to circulate in American culture.
  • provides a detailed background on the theory of race and racism
  • reveals how racializing discourse—talk and text that produces and reproduces ideas about races and assigns people to them—facilitates a victim-blaming logic
  • integrates a broad and interdisciplinary range of literature from sociology, social psychology, justice studies, critical legal studies, philosophy, literature, and other disciplines that have studied racism, as well as material from anthropology and sociolinguistics
  • Part of the Blackwell Studies in Discourse and Culture Series
Preface and Acknowledgments vi

1 The Persistence of White Racism 1

2 Language in White Racism: An Overview 31

3 The Social Life of Slurs 49

4 Gaffes: Racist Talk without Racists 88

5 Covert Racist Discourse: Metaphors, Mocking, and the Racialization of Historically Spanish-Speaking Populations in the United States 119

6 Linguistic Appropriation: The History of White Racism is Embedded in American English 158

7 Everyday Language, White Racist Culture, Respect, and Civility 175

Notes 183

References 197

Index 217

"Recommended [to] Most levels/libraries." (CHOICE, November 2009)

"This book makes an important contribution to the body of critical race scholarship in deconstructing how language is used to perpetuate racism and in doing so validates the author’s challenge to the common assumption that 'white racism has gone underground.'" (People with Voices, April 2009)

  • provides a detailed background on the theory of race and racism
  • reveals how racializing discourse—talk and text that produces and reproduces ideas about races and assigns people to them—facilitates a victim-blaming logic
  • integrates a broad and interdisciplinary range of literature from sociology, social psychology, justice studies, critical legal studies, philosophy, literature, and other disciplines that have studied racism, as well as material from anthropology and sociolinguistics