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The Little Book of Safe Money: How to Conquer Killer Markets, Con Artists, and Yourself

The Little Book of Safe Money: How to Conquer Killer Markets, Con Artists, and Yourself

Jason Zweig

ISBN: 978-0-470-59013-3

Nov 2009

256 pages

$12.99

Description

One of today's most influential financial commentators offers his advice on keeping your money safe in an uncertain world

The Little Book of Safe Money acts as a guide for those trying to make their way through today's down markets. The topics covered include everything from investing behavior-why our minds come with their own set of biases that often prove harmful-to the use of financial advisors. But this timely book goes one step further than the rest by questioning an investor's true appetite for risk.

The Little Book of Safe Money also contradicts many of the myths that whirl around Wall Street with chapters like "Why Ultra-ETFs Are Mega-Dangerous" and "Hedge-Fund Hooey." Writing in the classic Little Book style, author Jason Zweig peels away layer after layer of buzz words, emotion, and myths to reveal what's really going on in today's financial markets.

  • Outlines strategies for satisfying our ever-changing investment appetites while focusing on a long-term financial plan
  • Author Jason Zweig is a trusted voice in the financial community and his straightforward style resonates with investors
  • Offers practical guidance, tools, and tips for surviving and thriving in a down market

If you're serious about succeeding in today's turbulent markets, then The Little Book of Safe Money is what you should be reading.

Foreword.

Introduction.

Chapter One The Three Commandments.

Chapter Two Solid, Liquid, or Gas?

Chapter Three You Are an Egg.

Chapter Four Keeping Your Cash from Turning into Trash.

Chapter Five Guarantees Are Not All They're Cracked up to Be.

Chapter Six Fixing Your Fixed Income.

Chapter Seven Stocks for the Wrong Run.

Chapter Eight Rules for Stock Investors to Live By.

Chapter Nine Little Things Mean a Lot.

Chapter Ten How to Get Your Kids through College without Going Broke.

Chapter Eleven What Makes Ultra-ETFs Mega-Dangerous.

Chapter Twelve Hedge-Fund Hooey.

Chapter Thirteen Commodity Claptrap.

Chapter Fourteen Spicy Food Does Not Mean Hot Returns.

Chapter Fifteen WACronyms: Why Initials Are So Often the Beginning of the End.

Chapter Sixteen Sex.

Chapter Seventeen Mind Control.

Chapter Eighteen Financial Planning Fakery.

Chapter Nineteen Advice on Advice.

Chapter Twenty Fraudian Psychology

Chapter Twenty-One The Terrible Tale of the Missing $10 Trillion.

Chapter Twenty-Two How to Talk Back to Market Baloney.

Acknowledgments.

"A little book with big advice. Jason Zweig . . . doesn’t promise investors the moon, but in language that everyone can understand, he offers solid, common-sense steps to protect and improve their portfolios. . . Such advice is consistent with the bigidea of Zweig’s book: If an investment looks too good to be true, it probably is. And he offers a useful process to help readers remember it."
—SmartMoney.com

"There are very few in the financial media whose material I would consider recommended reading. Wall Street Journal columnist Jason Zweig is one of them, and his new book is one you should consider.  His latest work adds to his reputation for books that not only provide important insights into the winning investment strategy, but are also good reads. This little book is filled with sage counsel from which even sophisticated investors can benefit. . . His book also provides advice on how to avoid many of the behavioral mistakes investors keep repeating. As William Bernstein, who wrote the forward, put it: ‘Jason Zweig knows your financial demons, where they live, why they’re making your poor, and how you can beat them."
—Larry Swedroe, CBS MoneyWatch

This book is a well written, fascinating page turner that I read in one sitting with a big bag of microwave popcorn. Yet, I don’t just recommend a book because it was thoroughly enjoyable. The main reason to read this book is that it can put you on the path toward reaching financial freedom. But it’s up to you and whether you’d rather spend your retirement years pursuing your interests, or spend them asking strangers if they’d like their value meal supersized.
—Allan Roth, Founder of Wealth Logic, and author of How A Second Grader Beats Wall Street