Skip to main content

The Norton Field Guide to Writing, with Handbook, 3rd Edition

The Norton Field Guide to Writing, with Handbook, 3rd Edition

ISBN: 978-0-393-91958-5

*Norton agency titles

352 pages

Select type: Paperback

Product not available for purchase

Description

Flexible, easy to use, just enough detail—and now the number-one best seller.

With just enough detail — and color-coded links that send students to more detail if they need it — this is the rhetoric that tells students what they need to know and resists the temptation to tell them everything there is to know. Designed for easy reference — with menus, directories, and a combined glossary/index. The Third Edition has new chapters on academic writing, choosing genres, writing online, and choosing media, as well as new attention to multimodal writing.

The Norton Field Guide to Writing is available with a handbook, an anthology, or both — and all versions are now available as low-cost ebooks.

Related Resources

Instructor

Contact your Rep for all inquiries

Preface

How to Use This Book


Part 1: Rhetorical Situations
1: Purpose

2: Audience

3: Genre

4: Stance

5: Media / Design

*6: Writing in Academic Contexts


Part 2: Genres
7: Writing a Literacy Narrative

    *♦Emily Vallowe, “Write or Wrong Identity” 

    Marjorie Agosín, “Always Living in Spanish”

    Shannon Nichols, “Proficiency” 

    **♦Sofia Gomez, “Mother Goose in Monterrey”

8: Analyzing Texts

    *♦Hannah Berry, “The Fashion Industry: Free to Be”

    William Safire, “A Spirit Reborn”

    *Emily Nussbaum, “In Defense of Liz Lemon” 

    **Sam Anderson, “Just One More Game . . . Angry Birds, Farmville, and Other Hyperaddictive Stupid Games”

    ♦Stephanie Huff, “Metaphor and Society in Shelley’s ‘Sonnet’” 

9: Reporting Information

    *♦Michaela Cullington, “Does Texting Affect Writing?” 

    *Nicholas Carr, “Rural > City > Cyberspace: The Biggest Migration in Human History”

    James Fallows, “Throwing Like a Girl”

    **Matthew O’Brien, “The Strange Economics of Engagement Rings” 

10: Arguing a Position

    ♦Joanna MacKay, “Organ Sales”

    *Heather Douglas, “The Dark Side of Science”

    Lawrence Lessig, “Some Like It Hot”

    **Andrew Leonard, “Black Friday: Consumerism Minus Civilization” 

11: Abstracts

12: Annotated Bibliographies

    Michael Benton, Mark Dolan, Rebecca Zisch, “Teen Film$” 

    ♦Jessica Ann Olson, “Global Warming”

13: Evaluations

    ♦Ali Heinekamp, “Juno: Not Just Another Teen Movie”

14: Lab Reports

    ♦Sarah Thomas, “The Effect of Biofeedback Training”

15: Memoirs

    Rick Bragg, “All Over But the Shoutin’”

16: Profiles

    *♦Christian Danielsen, “Paperclip Man”

17: Proposals

    Michael Granof, “Course Requirement: Extortion”

18: Reflections

    Jonathan Safran Foer, “My Life as a Dog”

19: Résumés and Job Letters

20: Mixing Genres 

    Anna Quindlen, “Write for Your Life”

*21: Choosing Genres


Part 3: Processes
22: Writing as Inquiry

23: Collaborating

24: Generating Ideas and Text

25: Drafting

26: Assessing Your Own Writing

27: Getting Response and Revising

28: Editing and Proofreading

29: Compiling a Portfolio


Part 4: Strategies
30: Beginning and Ending

31: Guiding Your Reader

32: Analyzing Causes and Effects

33: Arguing

34: Classifying and Dividing

35: Comparing and Contrasting

36: Defining

37: Describing

38: Dialogue

39: Explaining Processes

40: Narrating

41: Reading Strategies

42: Taking Essay Exams


Part 5: Doing Research
43: Developing a Research Plan

44: Finding Sources

45: Evaluating Sources

46: Synthesizing Ideas

47: Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing

48: Acknowledging Sources, Avoiding Plagiarism

49: Documentation

50: MLA Style

51: APA Style


Part 6: Media / Design
*52: Choosing Media

*53: Designing Text

*54: Using Visuals

*55: Writing Online


Handbook
Sentences

Complete Sentences

Sentence Fragments 

Comma Splices, Fused Sentences

Verbs

Subject-Verb Agreement

Pronouns

Parallelism

Coordination and Subordination

Shifts

Language

Appropriate Words

Precise Words

Commonly Confused Words

Unnecessary Words

Adjectives and Adverbs

Articles

Words That Build Common Ground

Punctuation/Mechanics 

Commas

Semicolons

End Punctuation 

Quotation Marks

Apostrophes

Other Punctuation Marks

Hyphens

Capitalization

Italics

Abbreviations

Numbers


Glossary / Index

MLA and APA Directories

Handbook Menu


* New to the third edition

** Multimodal writing

♦ Student writing
USER-FRIENDLY, WITH JUST ENOUGH DETAIL
Tells students what they need to know, but resists the urge to tell them everything there is to know. Chapters are short and to the point, with color-coded links that send students to pages where they can find more detail if they need more. Menus, directories, documentation templates, and a unique glossary/index make it easy for students to find information quickly and efficiently.

UNIQUELY FLEXIBLE
With short chapters on every topic, this book supports any pedagogical approach. Instructors can focus on genres, strategies, the writing process, or the readings. Short chapters can be assigned in any order — and the color-coded links help draw from other chapters as needed.

NEW CHAPTERS ON ACADEMIC WRITING, CHOOSING GENRES, WRITING ONLINE, AND CHOOSING MEDIA

  • Chapter 6 discusses the conventions and expectations of academic writing 
  • Chapter 21 is on choosing genres, providing help for students with assignments that don’t specify a genre. 
  • Chapter 55 offers guidance on writing online, including helpful advice for students who are taking classes partially or entirely online. 
  • Three chapters on media and design have been expanded to provide more guidance for students who are now routinely working with media and images.

NEW ATTENTION TO MULTIMODAL WRITING
Chapter 52 describes the various media students now have available, helps them think about what they can and cannot do with each one, and includes guidance on multimodal writing. Multimodal readings have been added throughout the book, including one in each chapter of the anthology.

AN INTUITIVE, EASY-TO-USE HANDBOOK
The handbook is organized around Sentences, Language, and Punctuation/Mechanics, making it easy for students to find what they’re looking for. Color-coded links refer students to the glossary/index for definition of key terms if they need them, so there’s no overload of terminology.

NEW MEDIA RESOURCES
Norton Coursepacks are available for Blackboard, D2L, Sakai, Moodle, Canvas and other popular learning management systems. Customizable Coursepacks are free for students and adopters and include diagnostic quizzes and grammar exercises that report to the LMS gradebook. Model student essays, plagiarism tutorials, PowerPoints, animated videos, and citation exercises are also included.

Norton/write is a free-and-open-access website that allows students to practice grammar, punctuation, and mechanics.

A new online commenting program called Fred allows professors to insert comments on students’ papers and allows students to share their papers for peer review. Especially useful for online courses, Fred will allow anyone to add video or audio comments with a click of the mouse. In addition, Fred will include a robust menu of preset frequently used comments that will link to relevant sections in Norton’s online handbook, and it will allow instructors to write and save comments of their own. Fred can be packaged at an additional charge with any version of The Norton Field Guide.