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The Timid Corporation: Why Business is Terrified of Taking Risk

The Timid Corporation: Why Business is Terrified of Taking Risk

Benjamin Hunt

ISBN: 978-0-470-84368-0

Apr 2003

264 pages

Out of stock

$80.00

Description

This book looks at changing managerial styles in business and the predominance of risk aversion behavior over risk taking behavior. The author explores the various reasons (regulation and media scrutiny among them) that corporations are becoming more timid and analyzes the consequences this could have on the future of innovation and technological development in the business future.
Acknowledgements.

Introduction: The Rise of the Cautious Manager.

PART ONE: THE RE-REGULATION OF THE CORPORATION.

The New Dynamic of Regulation.

Self-Regulation: Entrenching Caution.

The Rise of Risk Management.

Managing for Shareholder Value: The New Financial Risk Aversion.

PART TWO: A TIMID APPROACH TO MARKETS.

Industry in Defensive Mode.

The New Obsession with the Customer.

The Dumbing-Down of Innovation.

Fear of Growth.

PART THREE: EXPLAINING AND CHALLENGING RISK AVERSION.

A Crisis of Self-Belief.

Conclusion: Challenging the Culture of Risk Aversion.

Bibliography.

Index.

"…Hunt’s book is recommended – and his rallying cry against risk aversion is attractively original…" (IT Week, 21 March 2003)

"…a penetrating new book…" (Morningstar, 17 April 2003)

"…Hunt does a good job of taking apart many of the assumptions that inform current business practice…" (Spiked-risk, 29 May 2003)

"…remarkable…contains some thought-provoking moments…" (Supply Management, 3 July 2003)

"…this book aims to provide reassurance…" (Gulf Business, August 2003)

"…Hunt has made a provocative case that business today is quite timid…" (Wall Street Journal, 27 August 2003)

"…Hunt is on to something: Most companies are shrinking back from bold moves…" (www.conference-board.org, September 2003)

"…Hunt has hit on a highly provocative theme.." (European Business Forum, Autum 2003)

"…Hunt is absolutely right…" (Ethical Consumer Magazine, October 2003)