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Thinking Syntactically: A Guide to Argumentation and Analysis

Thinking Syntactically: A Guide to Argumentation and Analysis

Liliane Haegeman

ISBN: 978-1-405-11853-8 October 2005 Wiley-Blackwell 398 Pages

 Paperback

In Stock

$63.95

Description

Thinking Syntactically: A Guide to Argumentation and Analysis is a textbook designed to teach introductory students the skills of relating data to theory and theory to data.

  • Helps students develop their thinking and argumentation skills rather than merely introducing them to one particular version of syntactic theory.
  • Structured around a wide range of exercises that use clear and compelling logic to build arguments and lead up to theoretical proposals.
  • Data drawn from current media sources, including newspapers, books, and television programs, to help students formulate and test hypotheses.
  • Generative in spirit, but does not focus on specific theoretical approaches but enables students to understand and evaluate different approaches more easily.
  • Written by an established author with an international reputation.

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Preface.

1: Introduction: The Scientific Study of Language.

Discussion.

Exercises.

2: Diagnostics for Syntactic Structure.

Discussion.

Exercises.

3: Lexical Projections and Functional Projections.

Discussion.

Exercises.

4: Refining Structures: From One Subject Position to Many.

Discussion.

Exercises.

5: The Periphery of the Sentence.

Discussion.

Exercises.

Bibliography.

Index.


  • An introductory textbook written by an established author with an international reputation.
  • Helps students develop their thinking and argumentation skills rather than merely introducing them to one particular version of syntactic theory.
  • Structured around a wide range of exercises that use clear and compelling logic to build arguments and lead up to theoretical proposals.
  • Features data drawn from current media sources, including newspapers, books, and television programs, to help students formulate and test hypotheses.
  • Does not focus on specific theoretical approaches but enables students to understand and evaluate different approaches more easily.