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What Can Be Done?: Making the Media and Politics Better

What Can Be Done?: Making the Media and Politics Better

John Lloyd (Editor), Jean Seaton (Editor)

ISBN: 978-1-405-13693-8

Aug 2006

172 pages

Select type: Paperback

Out of stock

$34.95

Description

This book proposes a series of reforms that could improve the media and politics, and the interaction of the two, in Britain.

  • This book makes an important contribution to public debate in Britain about the relationship between the media and politics.
  • Contributors include academics, journalists and political commentators.
  • Topical issues covered include regulation, public service broadcasting, managing the news, and training journalists.
  • The focus is on Britain, but key commentators from America and Europe put the British problems into perspective.
Notes on Contributors.

Introduction: Jean Seaton.

1. Hotting It Up: Jurgen Kronig.

2. The Virtues of an Unlovable Press: Michael Schudson.

3. The Epiphany of Joe Trippi: John Lloyd.

4. What’s Good on Television?: Tim Gardam.

5. Can the BBC Invigorate our Political Culture?: Steven Barnett.

6. The Rise of the Ranters: Saving Political Journalism: Peter Riddell.

7. Morally Engaged: Reporters in Crises: Martin Woollacott.

8. Lacking a Clear Narrative: Foreign Reporting after the Cold War: Suzanne Franks.

9. Digitising Democracy: Georgina Born.

10. Little Citizens: Children, the Media and Politics: Jean Seaton.

11. On the Cusp: Finding New Visions for Social Gain from Broadcasting: Don Redding.

Index.


  • This book makes an important contribution to public debate in Britain about the relationship between the media and politics.
  • Experts propose a series of reforms that could improve how the media perform and how politics functions.
  • Contributors include academics, journalists and political commentators.
  • Topical issues covered include regulation, public service broadcasting, managing the news, and training journalists.
  • The focus is on Britain, but key commentators from America and Europe put the British problems into perspective.