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Wiley Pathways Introduction to Programming using Visual Basic

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Where do you want to go? You might already be working in the information technology field and may be looking to expand your skills. You might be setting out on a new career path. Or, you might want to learn more about exciting opportunities in computer programming.

Wherever you want to go, Introduction to Programming Using Visual Basic will help you get there. Easy-to-read, practical, and up-to-date, this text not only helps you learn the fundamental concepts of programming with Visual Basic, it also helps you master the core competencies and skills you need to succeed in the classroom and in the real world. The book's brief, modular format and variety of built-in learning resources enable you to learn at your own pace and focus your studies.

With this book, you will be able to:
* Understand the fundamentals of programming using Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 and Microsoft Visual Basic 2005, from the ground up
* Break down what a program should do into steps and write code that describes those steps to the compiler
* Use variables, constants, and operators to store and perform operations on data within a program
* Save time with reusable code
* Use arrays and collections to manage lists of data
* Design an effective, easy-to-use user interface
* Apply object-oriented programming to build your own classes and use them in your projects
* Access relational data in an application
* Read data from and write data to files using Visual Basic
* Debug and handle exceptions in an application
* Deploy an application
* Build a Web application with Visual Basic, ASP.Net, and HTML.

Wiley Pathways helps you achieve your goals

Not every student is on the same path, but every student wants to succeed. The Information Technology series in the new Wiley Pathways imprint helps you achieve your goals. The books in this series--Introduction to Databases, Introduction to Programming Using Visual Basic, Introduction to Operating Systems, Networking Basics, Windows Network Administration, Network Security Fundamentals, and PC Hardware Essentials--offer a coordinated information technology curriculum. Learn more at www.wiley.com/go/pathways

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Wiley Pathways Introduction to Programming using Visual Basic

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1 An Introduction to Programming and Visual Basic 1

Introduction 2

1.1 Getting Familiar with Programming 2

1.1.1 An Introduction to Programming 2

1.1.2 Programs and Programming 4

1.1.3 Programming in Windows 7

1.1.4 Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming 9

1.1.5 The Programming Process 11

Self-Check 18

1.2 Working with Visual Studio 18

1.2.1 Installing Visual Studio 18

1.2.2 Getting Help with Visual Studio and Visual Basic 19

Self-Check 21

1.3 Creating Solutions and Projects 21

1.3.1 Creating a Windows Application Project 21

1.3.2 Using the Solution Explorer Window 22

1.3.3 Customizing the Visual Studio Environment 24

Self-Check 25

1.4 Understanding Forms 25

1.4.1 Defining a Form 26

1.4.2 Working with Forms in Design View 26

1.4.3 Setting Form Properties 27

1.4.4 Adding a Form to a Project 29

Self-Check 31

1.5 Using Controls 31

1.5.1 Using the Toolbox to Add Controls 32

1.5.2 Setting Control Properties 33

1.5.3 Adding a TextBox Control to a Form 34

1.5.4 Adding a Label Control to a Form 36

1.5.5 Adding a Button Control to a Form 36

Self-Check 37

1.6 Writing an Event-Driven Program 38

1.6.l Understanding Form Events 38

1.6.2 Using the Code Window 39

1.6.3 Understanding Control Events 41

1.6.4 Testing Your Code 41

Self-Check 42

Summary 42

Key Terms 43

Assess Your Understanding 45

Summary Questions 45

Applying This Chapter 48

You Try It 49

2 Using Variables, Constants, and Operators 50

Introduction 51

2.1 Declaring and Using Variables 51

2.1.1 Understanding Variables 51

2.1.2 Understanding How a Variable Uses Memory 52

2.1.3 Understanding Data Types 53

2.1.4 Declaring Variables 57

2.1.5 Naming Rules and Conventions 59

2.1.6 Assigning and Retrieving Values 59

Self-Check 62

2.2 Converting Between Data Types 62

2.2.1 Understanding Data Type Conversion 63

2.2.2 Using Data Type Conversion Functions 64

2.2.3 Validating Data: Fundamental Concepts 66

Self-Check 68

2.3 Using Literals, Constants, and Enumerations 69

2.3.1 Making Literals Type Safe 69

2.3.2 Declaring Constants 71

2.3.3 Declaring and Using Enumerations 72

Self-Check 74

2.4 Working with Operators 75

2.4.1 Performing Mathematical Operations 75

2.4.2 Using Comparison Operators 76

2.4.3 Managing the Order of Precedence 77

Self-Check 80

Summary 80

Key Terms 80

Assess Your Understanding 82

Summary Questions 82

Applying This Chapter 84

You Try It 85

3 Managing Program Flow 86

Introduction 87

3.1 Describing a Program, Using Algorithms and Flowcharts. 87

3.1.1 Writing Algorithms Using Pseudocode 87

3.1.2 Using Flowcharts 88

Self-Check 91

3.2 Writing Code That Makes Decisions 91

3.2.1 Using the If Then Statement 91

3.2.2 Using the If Then Else Statement 92

3.2.3 Using the Select Case Statement 96

3.2.4 Using Logical Operators 97

Self-Check 101

3.3 Repeating Yourself 101

3.3.1 Using a For Next Loop 101

3.3.2 Using Do Until...Loop and Do While...Loop 103

3.3.3 Using the While End While Loop 105

3.3.4 Ducking Out Before a Loop Is Over. 106

Self-Check 108

3.4 Debugging Code 108

3.4.1 Understanding Types of Errors 108

3.4.2 Desk Checking Logic 112

3.4.3 Setting Breakpoints 113

3.4.4 Stepping Through Code 115

3.4.5 Watching the Inner Workings of a Program 116

Self-Check 117

Summary 117

Key Terms 117

Assess Your Understanding 119

Summary Questions 119

Applying This Chapter 120

You Try It 122

4 Saving Time with Reusable Code 123

Introduction 124

4.1 Segmenting Code with Functions and Subprocedures 124

4.1.1 Using General Procedures 124

4.1.2 Types of General Procedures 125

4.1.3 Adding Subs and Functions 127

4.1.4 Invoking a Function or Sub 128

4.1.5 Scope and Lifetime 132

Self-Check 136

4.2 Object-Oriented Programming 136

4.2.1 Visual Basic Objects 137

4.2.2 OOP Concepts 137

4.2.3 Namespaces 140

4.2.4 Declaring and Using Objects 143

4.2.5 Using Shared Classes 144

Self-Check 145

4.3 Catching Errors Before They Catch You 145

4.3.1 About Exceptions 145

4.3.2 Structured Exception Handling 148

4.3.3 Using a Finally Block 151

Self-Check 154

Summary 154

Key Terms 154

Assess Your Understanding 156

Summary Questions 156

Applying This Chapter 157

You Try It 158

5 Using Arrays and Collections 159

Introduction 160

5.1 Arrays 160

5.1.1 About Arrays 160

5.1.2 Declaring an Array 161

5.1.3 Inputting Values to an Array 162

5.1.4 Displaying an Array 163

5.1.5 Using For Next and For Each Loops 164

Self-Check 166

5.2 Processing Arrays 166

5.2.1 Summing and Averaging Values 167

5.2.2 Finding the Largest and Smallest Values in an Array 167

5.2.3 Sorting an Array with Bubble Sort 170

5.2.4 Sorting with Array Object Methods 175

Self-Check 178

5.3 Multidimensional Arrays 178

5.3.1 Declaring Two-Dimensional Arrays 179

5.3.2 Input for Two-Dimensional Arrays 180

5.3.3 Processing Two-Dimensional Arrays 181

5.3.4 Arrays with More Than Two Dimensions 182

Self-Check 184

5.4 Using Collections 184

5.4.1 The ArrayList Class 184

5.4.2 The Hashtable Class 185

Self-Check 187

Summary 187

Key Terms 187

Assess Your Understanding 188

Summary Questions 188

Applying This Chapter 189

You Try It 191

6 Handling User Input and Formatting Output 192

Introduction 193

6.1 Building an Intuitive User Interface 193

6.1.1 Choosing the Right Controls 193

6.1.2 Configuring Keyboard Navigation 202

6.1.3 Anchoring and Docking Controls 203

6.1.4 Dynamic Controls 205

Self-Check 213

6.2 Manipulating and Formatting Strings 213

6.2.1 The String Class 213

6.2.2 Changing a String’s Case 214

6.2.3 Comparing Strings 214

6.2.4 Changing String Variables 216

Self-Check 221

6.3 Formatting Output 221

6.3.1 The Format Function 221

6.3.2 Formatting Date Values 221

Self-Check 227

Summary 227

Key Terms 227

Assess Your Understanding 228

Summary Questions 228

Applying This Chapter 230

You Try It 232

7 Building Menus and Toolbars 233

Introduction 234

7.1 Building an Intuitive User Interface 234

7.1.1 Designing Menus for Windows Programs 234

7.1.2 Designing a Menu System 236

7.1.3 The Menu Editor 236

7.1.4 Using the Items Collection Editor 238

7.1.5 Programming Menu Commands 241

7.1.6 Defining Access and Shortcut Keys 243

Self-Check 245

7.2 Manipulating Menus at Runtime 245

7.2.1 Creating Short and Long Menus 246

7.2.2 Adding and Removing Menu Commands at Runtime 246

7.2.3 Creating Context Menus 248

Self-Check 250

7.3 Creating Toolbars and Status Bars 251

7.3.1 Creating a Toolbar 251

7.3.2 Adding a StatusStrip Control 251

7.3.3 Adding a ToolStripContainer Control 253

Self-Check 255

Summary 255

Key Terms 256

Assess Your Understanding 257

Summary Questions 257

Applying This Chapter 258

You Try It 260

8 Creating Your Own Classes 261

Introduction 262

8.1 Defining and Adding Classes 262

8.1.1 Using Classes to Combine Code with Data 262

8.1.2 Building the Minimal Class 263

8.1.3 Adding Code to the Minimal Class 265

8.1.4 Property Procedures 266

Self-Check 271

8.2 Implementing Class Members 271

8.2.1 Raising Exceptions 272

8.2.2 Implementing Read-Only Properties 272

8.2.3 Custom Enumerations 274

8.2.4 Instance and Shared Methods 276

8.2.5 Overloading 279

Self-Check 283

8.3 Inheritance 283

8.3.1 The Importance of Inheritance 284

8.3.2 Inheriting Existing Classes 285

8.3.3 Inheriting Custom Classes 287

8.3.4 Polymorphism 290

8.3.5 Access Modifiers for Base Classes 294

8.3.6 MyBase and MyClass 295

Self-Check 303

8.4 Object Constructors 303

Self-Check 306

Summary 306

Key Terms 306

Assess Your Understanding 307

Summary Questions 307

Applying This Chapter 309

You Try It 310

9 Accessing Data 311

Introduction 312

9.1 Relational Database Fundamentals 312

9.1.1 Defining Database 312

9.1.2 Relational Databases 313

9.1.3 Database Management Systems 314

9.1.4 Structuring Data 314

9.1.5 Exploring a Sample Database 315

Self-Check 319

9.2 SQL Fundamentals 319

9.2.1 The SELECT Statement 319

9.2.2 Action Queries 327

Self-Check 330

9.3 Accessing a Database by Using Visual Basic 331

9.3.1 Data Access Overview 331

9.3.2 The Connection Objects 331

9.3.3 The DataAdapter Object 333

9.3.4 The DataSet Object 334

9.3.5 DataTable and Other Objects 335

9.3.6 Simple Data Binding 335

Self-Check 341

Summary 341

Key Terms 341

Assess Your Understanding 342

Summary Questions 342

Applying This Chapter 344

You Try It 347

10 Programming Input and Output 348

Introduction 349

10.1 File Input and Output Concepts 349

10.1.1 Sequential Access Files 349

10.1.2 Direct Access Files 350

Self-Check 353

10.2 Accessing Files by Using Visual Basic 353

10.2.1 Reading and Writing Text Files 354

10.2.2 Reading and Writing Binary Files 355

10.2.3 Reading and Writing Sequential Files. 355

10.2.4 Reading and Writing Direct Access Files 355

10.2.5 Interacting with the File System 357

Self-Check 361

10.3 Working with Graphics 361

10.3.1 Introducing GDI_ 361

10.3.2 The Coordinate System 363

10.3.3 Drawing Graphics 363

Self-Check 369

10.4 Printing 370

10.4.1 The PrintDocument Object 370

10.4.2 Previewing and Printing the PrintDocument Object 373

Self-Check 374

Summary 375

Key Terms 375

Assess Your Understanding 376

Summary Questions 376

Applying This Chapter 378

You Try It 379

11 Deploying Your Application 380

Introduction 381

11.1 Deployment Concepts 381

11.1.1 Deployment and Installation 381

11.1.2 Versioning and Upgrades 382

11.1.3 Assemblies 382

Self-Check 385

11.2 Planning a Deployment 385

11.2.1 Deployment Methods 385

11.2.2 Identifying Required Changes 388

Self-Check 395

11.3 Preparing for Deployment 395

11.3.1 Test, Test, Test 395

11.3.2 Conditional Compilation 397

11.3.3 Setting Project Properties 398

Self-Check 402

11.4 Deploying with Windows Installer 402

11.4.1 Creating a Windows Installer Package 403

11.4.2 Using the File System Editor 405

11.4.3 Setup Project Properties 409

11.4.4 Creating Shortcuts 410

11.4.5 File Types and Custom Commands 411

11.4.6 Using the Registry Editor 413

11.4.7 Using the User Interface Editor 414

Self-Check 418

Summary 418

Key Terms 419

Assess Your Understanding 420

Summary Questions 420

Applying This Chapter 422

You Try It 424

12 Building Web Applications 425

Introduction 426

12.1 Web Application Fundamentals 426

12.1.1 Understanding Internet Communication 426

12.1.2 Websites and Webpages 427

12.1.3 About HTML 428

12.1.4 Server/Client Interaction 429

Self-Check 431

12.2 HTML Fundamentals 431

12.2.1 HTML Document Structure 431

12.2.2 Basic HTML Tags 432

12.2.3 Inserting Graphics 436

12.2.4 Using Tables 438

12.2.5 Using Forms and Controls 445

Self-Check 454

12.3 Building a Web Application 454

12.3.1 Creating an ASP.NET Application 455

12.3.2 Designing a Web Form 456

12.3.3 Viewing the HTML for a Form 458

12.3.4 Coding an Application 461

12.3.5 Maintaining State 463

Self-Check 466

Summary 466

Key Terms 466

Assess Your Understanding 468

Summary Questions 468

Applying This Chapter 470

You Try It 472

Appendix 473

Glossary 477

Index 503

Chapters. Each chapter is broken down into an average of four or five concise sections. A short assessment is provided at the end of each section.