Advice to Early Career Researchers from Leading Academic Psychologists

August 11, 2017 Laura Orchard

Are you an aspiring author? The early stages of your career offer many exciting opportunities. If you’re new to the publishing process however, selecting the right journal for your research or successfully promoting your published article can be challenging prospects.

We asked delegates at the European Congress of Psychology to draw on their experiences and share their top tips for early career researchers. We received an overwhelming response of inspirational advice and practical tips, from finding a good mentor to keeping an open mind.

See below for a snapshot of conversations from leading psychologists from the British Psychological Society, the International Association of Applied Psychology, the American Counseling Association, the Australian Psychological Society, and the International Union of Psychological Science.

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“Follow your passion! Work hard and play hard” Abigail Gewirtz, Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Psychology

"The most important thing is to select the right journal for your publications:

  • Not too lengthy in terms of the reviewing process
  • Not too difficult/easy acceptance rate
  • Relevant to your topic!”

Christine Roland-Levy, President-Elect, International Association of Applied Psychology

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“Be true to yourself” Saths Cooper, President, International Union of Psychological Science

“Put passion [into your work], and work to be evidence based, paying attention to people” José Maria Peiro, International Association of Applied Psychology

 

“A career only makes sense looking backwards. Go with what you have to do.” Simon Crowe, Honorary Fellow, Australian Psychological Society

“Stay true to your ideas – they will shape the field’s future.” Caroline Clauss-Ehlers, Editor, Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development

“Collaborate, collaborate, collaborate” Daryl O’Connor, Chair of Research Board, British Psychological Society

“Work hard and network” Janel Gauthier, President, International Association of Applied Psychology

  • “Don’t get side-tracked
  • Ignore anyone you don’t rate
  • Pretend to take account of those you do
  • Follow your own route”

Pam Maras, President-Elect, International Union of Psychological Science

What advice do you have to add for researchers just starting out? Share with us in the comments below.

About the Author

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